You're not connected to the Internet.
Corporate logo
Home cinemaKnow-how 6774

Ultra HD Premium: What’s the point?

Labels are supposed to create clarity for customers. But they notoriously defeat their purpose. Ultra HD Premium is a recent example. It’s good in theory, but absolutely no help when it comes down to choosing a TV. Read on to find out why.

If you’re not a techie, all the terms and labels associated with tech products can be very confusing. You might even get up to speed and read up about everything regarding one topic, only to realise a few months later that all your knowledge is already outdated. New terms, labels and technologies are invented all the time, putting you back to square one when it comes to choosing the product that fits your needs. Plus, some manufacturers come up with features you didn’t even know you needed.

UHD Alliance have taken the same line. At the beginning of 2016, after weeks of tough negotiations with manufacturers, they came up with the label «Ultra HD Premium».

This is what the label looks like.

Their intention was to make it easier to understand all the different terms manufacturer use: The label «Ultra HD Premium» indicates that a TV meets the minimum requirements for a high-end experience.

Got it? Nor did I.

Let’s take things step by step: What does Ultra HD stand for?

Is there a difference between 4K and Ultra HD (UHD)? Of course there is, but most people don’t know or care about it. So Ultra HD isn’t the answer to everything after all? I’m afraid it isn’t. This is confusing, as «Ultra HD» sounds rather impressive. But in fact, «premium» is quite a bit better. Don’t try to understand it, it’s just marketing.

This is how many terms and labels cover TV packaging.

All jokes aside, the label has good intentions. And it’s helpful – as long as you know exactly what it stands for.

Let’s begin with resolution. The established default format is Full HD, which stands for a resolution of 1920 × 1080 pixels (width × height) and an aspect ratio of 16:9. Most TV channels and YouTube videos are in Full HD. Since 2016, 4K is growing in popularity. This format corresponds to 4096 × 2160 pixels and an aspect ratio of 19:10. However, as we’re so used to the 16:9 aspect ratio, content is scaled down to 3840 × 2160 pixels – the format that should be referred to as «Ultra HD». It should, but most people call it «4K».

Why’s that? Here’s my theory: Most people have no clue what to expect from a TV that has «Ultra HD» on its packaging. My guess is that it’s too similar to «Full HD» and the two get mixed up quite often. To make sure everyone knows that a TV has extraordinary resolution, manufacturers prefer using the label «4K».

My point is: If it says «4K» on the box, it’s likely that what you’re actually getting isn’t 4K resolution but Ultra HD resolution with 3840 horizontal pixels. But who cares about correct specs anyway?!

An illustration of various resolutions. Source: EIZO

What does Ultra HD Premium stand for?

Let’s face the key question of this article: What on earth is Ultra HD Premium?

As I mentioned before, the term was coined by UHD Alliance in collaboration with manufacturers and studios such as Samsung, LG, Sony, Panasonic, Disney, 20th Century Fox and Netflix.

They were aware of the confusion surrounding labels and wanted to establish an industry-wide consensus that marks which TVs really offer high-end specs, i.e. the best resolution, contrasts and colours. As the requirements are identical for all manufacturers and an independent UHD Alliance committee decides which products deserve the label, it’s impossible to cheat.

These four aspects are the key to the Ultra HD Premium label: resolution, colour depth, colour space and dynamic range.

1. Minimum resolution of 3840 × 2160 pixels

This is the easy part. The resolution of a TV has to meet or exceed Ultra HD, which means that, no matter how large your TV is, the image is made up of at least eight million pixels. To put this in relation: Full HD TVs have two million pixels.

2. Minimum colour depth of 10 bit

To wear the UHD Premium badge, TVs need to support 10-bit colour depth (as opposed to 8 bit with Full HD). A Full HD TV displays about 16.7 million colours; an Ultra HD Premium TV 1.07 billion colours. This corresponds to the HDR standard «HDR10» – 10 standing for 10 bits.

On the left: 10-bit colour depth.
On the right : 8-bit colour depth.

This illustration shows the differences between 10-bit and 8-bit. The difference is particularly noticeable where the sun reflects on the water. The transitions are more fluid on the left than on the right.

Note: No single frame displays all colours at once (and besides, we’re not capable of sensing every single colour), but the more colours are available, the more natural the image will look.

3. Colour space representation: BT.2020 and DCI-P3

While almost every middle-end TV meets the first two requirements, colour space is a different story. This aspect separates the wheat from the chaff.

Let me warn you: If the first part of this article has been too technically demanding for your taste, you might struggle with the next part. Sorry!

Firstly, a Premium TV needs to be capable of processing BT.2020 signals. Secondly, it needs to cover over 90% of the DCI-P3 colour space. Sound complicated? Well, I warned you. But don’t worry, it makes perfect sense. BT. 2020 and DCI-P3 are names for the most commonly used colour spaces in the film industry. They are standards that define how colour information is transmitted via video signal; signals that tell the TV which red or blue to display in a specific frame.

Visual representation of the most common colour spaces including DCI-P3 and BT. 2020 (Rec. 2020). Source: Tested.com

The colours within a specific colour space are exactly defined. An Ultra HD Premium TV needs to be capable of processing the colours within the colour space of the BT. 2020 standard and displaying at least 90% of the colours of the DCI-P3 standard. By comparison, conventional Full HD TVs only display the sRGB / Rec. 709 standard, which only covers 80% of the DCI-P3 colour space.

On the left: colour space DCI-P3
On the right: colour space Rec. 709

Another visual representation to show the differences in colour spaces.

As the illustration above shows, there are various colour spaces. Why is this necessary? Because the human eye has a much higher colour spectrum than TVs, projectors and PC monitor are capable of displaying. The larger the defined colour space, the higher the hardware requirements. If you look at the illustration again, you will see that your TV needs to process more colours (BT. 2020 / Rec. 2020) than it has to reproduce (at least 90% of the DCI-P3 colour space).

4. Minimum dynamic range for HDR

HDR is a complex topic. If you really want to get to the nitty-gritty of it, check out this article (in German). I’m not going into great detail in the following paragraph, but will keep to what’s important to understand this article.

On the left: HDR standard Dolby Vision.
On the right: HDR standard HDR10.

HDR is short for High Dynamic Range. It represents the contrast range; in HDR TVs, the difference from the darkest to the lightest colour is much larger than with Full HD TVs. Therefore, the colours we see are more natural and vivid.

To obtain the Ultra HD Premium label, a TV needs to fulfil minimum requirements regarding dynamic range. Before I go into these, let’s have a look at the two main technologies on the market: LCD and OLED. The main difference is that with OLED, the light-emitting diodes (pixels) are organic and switch themselves on or off as required. Just like a lamp. This results in unmatched black levels. LCD screens, on the other hand, are brighter, which benefits well-lit living rooms.

Sure, it’s not the most natural-looking picture, but it highlights how the large contrast range of HDR boosts the colour spectrum and provides richer and more natural colours.

Neither the absolute brightness and black levels nor the technology (LCD or OLED) are crucial to the UHD Alliance, but the difference between the brightest and darkest colour; the dynamic range. There are two options to meet the minimum requirements of the UHD Alliance:

  • Option 1: Maximum brightness of at least 1000 Nit and black levels of no more than 0.05 Nit.
  • Option 2: Maximum brightness of at least 540 Nit and black levels of no more than 0.0005 Nit.

In other words: The UHD Alliance has found a way to make everyone happy. Hooray!

So the Ultra HD Premium label is a good thing after all?

It is in theory. It covers all aspects of high-quality televisions and offers an objective and standardised rating of TVs, which allows no manufacturers to call their product high-end if it isn’t. Plus, when you’re looking for a new TV, you can ignore all the marketing slogans and promises of manufacturers and just go by this label. Great, right?

What are the downsides?

Imagine there’s a standardised label for everyone, but nobody agrees to use it. It’s not as bad as this in reality, but it only takes one large manufacturer, Sony for instance, to ignore it (despite being a member of the UHD Alliance) and the intention of the label fails. There are several Sony TVs that fulfil all requirements and deserve the label, but don’t have it.

On top of that, the label hasn’t eliminated all other terms and labels that manufacturers come up with, but rather added another one. Samsung and LG use «SUHD» or «Super Ultra HD», Panasonic use their own 4K label and to make things even more complicated, Ultra HD Blu-rays launched their own 4K label in spring 2017.

How are we supposed to navigate our way through the label jungle?

A silly trend

Two years have passed since the Ultra HD Premium label was introduced, but TV manufacturers still prefer using their own terms and labels than this official seal of quality. Especially the term 4K is everywhere. On top of that, the UHD Alliance has been criticised for ignoring aspects such as motion blur, frame interpolation, clouding, smearing or display settings. Fair point. What about display settings? Well, some manufacturers are so keen to fulfil the Ultra HD Premium requirements that they adjust the display settings in a way that makes it difficult to actually watch TV. For example, the display might be so bright that it hurts your eyes and you have to readjust the display settings.

What about commerce?

The label hasn’t gained acceptance in commerce either. I’m not going to lie: At digitec, we’ve also realised that our customer search for «4K» much more often than for «Ultra HD». It seems that 4K has burned into people’s minds and trying to re-educate everyone, although with good intentions, is just a waste of time.

Outlook

The UHD Alliance meant well when they launched their label, but it doesn’t look like it’s going to gain acceptance. With all the terms and labels on TV packaging, it’s hard to tell marketing inventions from actual seals of quality. If you’re looking for a new TV, my advice is to ignore the labels and do your own research and testing – even for premium models.

These articles might also interest you

Regen? Von Netflix empfohlene TVs und weitere News
Product know-how

Regen? Von Netflix empfohlene TVs und weitere News

Was bringt dir ein <strong>«Ultra HD Premium»</strong> TV?
Product recommendation

Was bringt dir ein «Ultra HD Premium» TV?

Shopping guide: <strong>6 steps</strong> to the right television
Inspiration

Shopping guide: 6 steps to the right television

User
I'm an outdoorsy guy and enjoy sports that push me to the limit – now that’s what I call comfort zone! But I'm also about curling up in an armchair with books about ugly intrigue and sinister kingkillers. Being an avid cinema-goer, I’ve been known to rave about film scores for hours on end. I’ve always wanted to say: «I am Groot.»

67 comments

Please log in.

You have to be logged in to create a new comment.


User Thoemsey13

Top Beitrag! Habe da aber einen Fehler gefunden:
"Egal welche Zoll-Grösse, das Bild deiner Glotze besteht stets aus mindestens 8 Millionen Pixeln. Full HD-Fernseher haben im Vergleich dazu genau die Hälfte der Bildpunkte."

Full-HD hat 1/4 der Bildpunkte (2'000'000) und nicht 1/2.

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Luca Fontana

Danke dir! Und danke für den Hinweis, du hast natürlich absolut recht. Shame on me :)

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User fumo

Ja das ist jetzt echt zum schämen weil man schon in der Primarschule lernt dass Flächen im Quadrat zu berechnen sind! Kann man nicht als Flüchtigkeitsfehler sehen tut mir leid.

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Dezphere

Satzzeichen setzen lernt man auch da... :)

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Luca Fontana

Erbarmen, Fumo ;)

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User dramos84

Flächen werden nicht im Quadrat berechnet, sondern Länge mal Breite. Das Quadrat ist nur ein Sonderfall welcher hier nicht relevant ist. Kann ich leider auch nicht als Flüchtigkeitsfehler durchgehen lassen... Sorry ;-)

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User rudinpatrick

Digitec könnte jeweils angeben, wieviel Prozent des Farbraumes Rec. 2020 durch den entsprechenden Fernseher abgedeckt sind. Diese Daten kriegt man sonst nämlich fast nicht raus, und hier trennt sich dann wirklich die Spreu vom Weizen. Und nur so nebenbei, 2020 ist auch schon veraltet, schon längst haben die Gremien die Recommandation 2100 verabschiedet.
In welchem Farbraum die 4K-Blurays gemastert werden darf jetzt jeder selber gerne raten...

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Zeitphantom

vielen dank für diesen super beitrag, auch wenn ich jetzt nur ein klitzekleines bisschen mehr nicht weiss, welchen tv ich mir irgendwann kaufen darf/muss/soll/werde :-D

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Luca Fontana

Nun, wenigstens weisst du jetzt, worauf du NICHT achten musst ;). Spass beiseite, UHD Premium ist ein guter Indikator, aber verlass dich nicht alleine auf dieses Label. Zudem: Kein Label bedeutet nicht automatisch, dass der TV nichts taugt. Mit meinem Artikel wollte ich vorallem sagen: Schau dir die Spezifikationen an, nicht die Labels, und schau dir die TVs selber an, bevor du sie kaufst, um böse Überraschungen zu meiden.

Gruss, Luca

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User antonyrobe0

Für ein online Shop, dass nur ein paar showrooms hat ein böses Kommentar. Wo soll man also dieses Fernseher anschauen, bei Mediamarkt, und dann hier kaufen? Schöne Ethik sag ich :-), langfristig wird das nicht funktionieren.

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Iceteavanill

Ist es möglich das Digitec/Galaxus all diese irrelevanten Standards der Hersteller einfach in einen universellen Standard umrechnet welchen es leichter machen würde einzelne Produkte untereinander zu vergleichen?

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Luca Fontana

Guten Morgen! Tatsächlich haben wir so etwas in der Art bereits. Du findest es in den Spezifikationen unter «Bildqualitätsindex». Verschiedene relevanten Kriterien fliessen in diese Zahl ein: Je höher der Index, desto besser die Qualität. Wichtig aber: Der Bildqualitätsindex hat nur INNERHALB der Marke eine Aussagekraft. Sprich: es ist nicht möglich, den Bildqualitätsindex von einem Sony und einem Samsung-Modell zu vergleichen, die Zahlen wurden auf unterschiedliche Art und Weise errechnet.

Zu erklären, wie, warum und wieso das so ist, würde den Rahmen dieses Kommentars sprengen. Vielleicht liefe ich da in naher Zukunft einen Artikel nach :).

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User supportkme

Digitec isch eifach geil! Hanis scho mal gseit?? :-)

18.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User gm5star

Prinzipiell wird das TV-Signal als 3840x2160 geliefert, in dieser Auflösung ist auch der Film auf einer UHD Blu ray abgelegt. Von daher wird am Heimgerät nichts herunterskaliert. In was die Originalquelle vorliegt ist ein anderes Thema. Dies kann von 8k über 35mm Film alles mögliche sein.

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User MakeAppsNotWar

4k gibt es nicht erst seit "4k".

4k kommt von DCI, dem Kino Standart, schondamals im Full HD Alter war Kino 2048:1080 statt 1920:1080.

-> 2k


Bzw dann eben 4096:1716 für 2.39:1 (21:8) Iinhalte

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User philipp.wick

Was ist "Standart"? Oder meinten Sie vielleicht StandarD!?

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User MakeAppsNotWar

@Philipp.Wick #GrammarN4z1

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User patrickobe1

Für die Neugierigen, man kann sogar nach Ultra HD Premium filtern, ganze 10 von knapp 200 TVs werden dann noch angezeigt:
digitec.ch/de/s1/producttyp...

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User patrickobe1

Oh noch etwas, ich wünschte mir einen Artikel für TV Möbel. Es sollten nur Modelle mit folgenden Eigenschaften gewählt werden: Kompatibilität mit 75" TV (Gewicht!), ein grosser AVR wie der heute in Aktion befindliche Marantz SR-7011, 2-3 Spielkonsolen und noch eine TV Empfangsbox.

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User 284SXx

Es sind doch immerhin 41/218. So schlimm steht's nun auch wieder nicht...

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User patrickobe1

Haha, dann wurden seit meinem Kommentar von Gestern 31 weitere TVs durch Digitec nachgeführt :)

18.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Mandarb01

Viele Mittelklasse-Fernseher haben leider immer noch nur 8bit Panel verbaut. Und viele Hersteller verstecken es hinter Marketingbezeichnungen. Bei Panasonic kann ich nur raten, bei Samsung finde ich es in den technischen Daten... Wenn jetzt nur die Verkäufer noch richtig beraten würden...

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User danielwernerch

Danke für den Beitrag. Das herunter- oder hochrechnen des Materials (Downscaling / Upscaling) benötigt eine erhebliche Rechenleistung. Mir ist auch nicht bekannt, dass "Consumer"-Formate (Bluray oder Webdownload) mit echtem 4K arbeiten. 10bit ist ein Verkaufargument, wie die Farbräume.

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User gm5star

Aber sicher doch gibt es 4K UHD Blu rays welche real UHD Nutzen, sprich das DI (Digital Intermediate) in realem 4k vorgelegen ist für die Verarbeitung auf UHD Blu ray. Viele sind zwar nur ab einem 2K DI und somit hochskaliert, aber auf der 4k UHD Blu ray ist die Auflösung immer 3840x2160.

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User gm5star

Zumal ja dann nichts hoch oder runterkaliert werden muss. Und jeder aktuelle TV schafft ein Upscaling auf 4k, beginnend mit dem 576i SD TV Signal. Sonst würde man auf dem 4K TV bei einem SD TV Signal garnichts mehr erkennen ohne Upscaling.

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User gm5star

Und 10bit ist kein Verkaufsargument sondern nötig um HDR anzuzeigen. HDR 4k Blu rays werden mit 10bit erstellt.

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Anonymous

Toller Artikel

Als nächstes wäre eine Erklärung nett, weshalb im Fernsehen selbst auf HD Sendern vor allem Schwarz zu grauenhafter pixelartigen Artefakten führt, aber so gut wie nie bei der Werbung. Überhaupt scheint mir das Programm auf HD Sendern oft schlechter als DVDs zu sein

24.02.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User sindsieben

Und all dies unter dem Umstand dass digitec 4K TV Geräte verkauft die ohne zusätzliche Geräte nicht in der Lage sind kostenpflichtige Filme in 4K wiederzugeben.

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User gm5star

Hä? 4K TV Geräte können häufig z.B. Netflix 4K (UHD) wiedergeben. Und um eine UHD Blu Ray zu wiedergeben ist ja logisch, dass man den entsprechenden Player hat. Reales 4K (4096x2160p) ist für den Heimgebrauch absolut irrelevant, da es sich bei dieser Auflösung um eine Auflösung rein fürs Kino (Projektoren) handelt. Zudem sind Filme sowieso immer in 16:9 oder 21:9, von daher brauchts auch nicht mehr wie UHD Auflösung.

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User MakeAppsNotWar

Jap UHD Oder 4kScope (4096x1716) was dann eben "21:9" wäre

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User sindsieben

Habe eigentlich kostenpflichtige Filme angesprochen. Die sind bei den 4K TVs nur in HD und SD bestellbar.

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User MakeAppsNotWar

Was für "Kostenpflichtige Filme"?
Jeder Film kostet... Meinst du DVD/Bluerays?
In diesem Fall benötigst du halt einen DVD/BlueRay Player, aber das war schon immer so und ist eigentlich auch sinnvoll.

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User sindsieben

zB auf der Google Play, Hollystar, Exlibris App gibts nur Filme in SD, HD.

16.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User manatukaitiaki

In Japan ist doch 8K schon fast veralteter Standard. Also, warum kaufen wir Europäer noch veraltete 4K Displays?

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User sonyc78

Was bringt dir 8k bei einer Glotze mit 55 oder 65 Zoll Diagonale im Moment und wie kommst du darauf dass in Japan 8k schon fast veraltet sein soll? Auch die haben ja kaum 8k Content...

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User MakeAppsNotWar

Nein?! Auch in Japan ist 4k Standard, 8k TVs sind noch teuer und haben noch nicht ganz so hohe Auswahl

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User silverskunkk

Wo gibts den 8k tv zu kaufen?

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User gm5star

Ich war soeben in Japan, ist jetzt nicht so, dass in jeder Sushi-Bude 8K TVs rumstehen und 8K Kontent drüber läuft. Die sind vielleicht technisch Infrastrukturmässig meist etwas voraus (Austrahlungsmöglichkeit) aber dort haben im Haushalt genausoviele Leute 8K TVs wie hier aktuell. Also ca. 0,00000001%.

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User MakeAppsNotWar

@Gm5star Jop.

Zu dem sind die wenigsten Inhalte 8k, zumal die einzige Digital kamera mit 8k die RED Dragon und Weapon ist, welche man nicht eben so rumliegen hat.

Und selbst wenn 8k gefilmt wird, ist der Output meist 4k, das 8k ist für andere Dinge gut (Z.B. Tracking)
Selbst die meisten Kinos sind nur 2k

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment