You're not connected to the Internet.
Corporate logo
GamingBackground information 10878

What about the loot box ban – does it apply to Switzerland?

Belgium and the Netherlands have declared loot boxes are gambling after an investigation into three culprits: «Fifa 18», «Overwatch» and «Counter-Strike: Global Offensive». What impact does this have on the gaming scene and Switzerland in particular?

The issue of loot boxes within video games had been raised before, but it was «Star Wars Battlefront 2» that really set it all off. The loot box system in this popular game caused such a stir that the video game producer Electronic Arts (EA) finally decided to roll back on loot boxes. But it was too late; the damage had already been done. Ironically, «Battlefront 2» isn’t among the games that the Belgian Gaming Commission opened an investigation into – at the time the investigation was conducted, EA had already dropped the micro transactions.

The titles mentioned are «Fifa 18», «Overwatch» and «Counter-Strike: Global Offensive» and instructions have been given to game publishers to remove all loot boxes. Failure to do so may result in an 800,000 euro fine and a five-year prison sentence. Recently, a similar decision was taken in the Netherlands, banning «Fifa 18», «Dota», «PUBG» and «Rocket League». While the Dutch authorities warned video game publishers to modify their loot boxes before mid-June, Belgium has not yet given a deadline.

EA’s answer came promptly: Talking to Eurogamer, the video game producer denies the allegations, stating it does not agree that its games can be considered as any form of gambling. Belgian Minister of Justice Koen Geens states he welcomes the dialogue, but is striving for a Europe-wide ban at the same time. This could cause huge losses for game manufacturers, who are sure to put up resistance. And in the end, the victims of this battle could be us gamers.

«Battlefront 2» triggered the discussions but was able to dodge danger just in time.

What’s it really about?

The current debate isn’t about micro transactions, DLCs and season passes; it’s only about loot boxes. Loot boxes are digital grab bags that players can only get by spending real or in-game currency on. The trick is that you don’t always know what’s inside. It could be a new outfit that just looks good or it could be new equipment or weapons that become a decisive strategic advantage in the game. The Belgian Gaming Commission is criticising the lack of transparency and the emotional element of chance – especially when it comes to children and young people. Not knowing what a loot box contains and paying with in-game currencies is said to obscure the real value. These and other reasons have led to the mentioned games being classified as gambling, forcing game providers to act.

The gaming industry’s options

With the exception of Psyonix («Rocket League»), the game manufacturers affected by this ban are among the largest and most ambitious in the world. They're sure to have enough resources and lawyers at hand to tackle the problem and find loopholes. In my opinion, the following short-term and medium-term solutions exist.

«Rocket League» is also guilty of using loot boxes.

Removing loot boxes

The supposedly simplest solution is to remove the loot boxes from the games in question – only in the two countries for the time being. However, «Battlefront 2» has shown that this isn't as simple as it seems, as loot boxes can be an essential part of the game and so deeply integrated into the logic and the system that they cannot just be removed from one day to the next. Nevertheless, this is probably the most short-term solution.

Modifying the system

EA, Valve, Blizzard and other game producers have the option of modifying their games to make sure no real currency comes into play when dealing with loot boxes, keys and the such. Of course, this includes removing the possibility of buying in-game currency with real currency. Another option would be to increase transparency and only allow spending money on items of value instead of random loot box contents. In any case, major modifications to the games would be necessary to establish a new system. Nevertheless, this is also a possible way to go.

Withdrawing games from sale

Of course, game providers could decide to take their games off the market in the countries that have banned loot boxes. All affected games have long passed their sales peak, so this measure wouldn’t do game manufacturers huge damage. However, withdrawing games from sale isn’t simple. What about the games that have already been sold? Would online services and servers be taken offline to make sure the affected games can no longer be purchased? This is unthinkable for online titles such as «Overwatch» and «Counter-Strike: GO». Game providers wouldn’t do themselves a service by doing this, even if customers got their money back. I doubt that this option will be chosen.

YouTube videos of loot boxes have long become a mass phenomenon.

Losses in the millions

Whichever option is chosen; the gaming industry is sure to face million-mark losses. Many of today’s video games are only maintained and updated with new content for such a long time, because – after being purchased – they generate additional steady income through DLCs, micro transactions and loot boxes. With the game mode FIFA Ultimate Team, for example, EA already generates a yearly income of over 800 million dollars. Gamers can purchase FUT Packs including new soccer players and a range of bonuses with in-game currency, which is earned or can be bought with real currency.

Although Belgian Minister of Justice Koen Geens emphasised that the goal was to find a joint solution with the game providers, it remains uncertain whether loot boxes will survive. The German Youth Protection Commission is now also considering a ban on loot boxes. The scope would become even greater if the decision was taken to extend the ban to all EU countries. The EU has proven that it can stand its ground against international companies with the fight over the Data Protection Act, so it's likely that loot boxes won't be able to withstand the pressure of the European Union either.

«Fifa» makes most of its money with loot boxes.

The situation is a lot different in the US, where consumer protection isn’t as strict. It’s therefore possible that there will be two loot box systems in the future: one for the US and one for Europe.

Consequences for Switzerland

Should the EU declare loot boxes as gambling and force game providers to take action, we can assume that the ban will apply to Switzerland, too. Although Switzerland could, in theory, form an exception as long as enough other countries outside the EU keep the current loot box system, but this is rather unlikely, as we rely on the translated versions released for France, Italy and Germany.

Yet, there’s no need for us to wait for the decisions of our neighbouring countries. What does the Swiss law say about loot boxes? The Federal Act on Games of Chance and Casinos (in German) states the following:

According to Article 3 paragraph 1 of the Federal Act on Games of Chance and Casinos of 18 December 1998 (SR 935.52; FGA), games of chance are games in which, in return for putting in a stake, there is the prospect of a monetary gain or other gain with monetary value, which depends entirely or predominantly on chance. The execution of such games is reserved solely for licensed casinos (Article 4 paragraph 1 DSBG); these are obliged to comply with the provisions of casino legislation and the licence conditions and are supervised by the Swiss Federal Gaming Board (SFGB).

To me, it sounds as if loot boxes – as used in numerous games – are exactly this; you buy a loot box for real currency and make a random gain in return. In the case of the outfits in «PUBG» or the skins in «CS:GO» , these gains can be worth a lot of money. However, the Swiss Federal Gaming Board currently sees no reason to take action.

«The loot boxes you mentioned are, so to speak, a “game within a game” that appears during the course of a computer or video game and usually only makes up a small part of the game in relation to the whole computer or video game.»

According to Maria Chiara Saraceni from the Swiss Federal Gaming Board, computer, console and video games are, as a general rule and following the definition by the Federal Act on Games of Chance and Casinos, not games of chance and therefore not part of SFGB’s field of competence. She adds that this statement is based on current information.

There seem to be primarily two factors that contradict the classification as a game of chance: Being a game in a game and the fact that loot boxes are not the main aspect of the game. So a video game in which you’re visiting a fully functioning casino would probably not pass? «Correct. If we see that it is first and foremost a game of chance, then it also falls under the Federal Act on Games of Chance and Casinos,» Saraceni explains. But she also stresses that each game needs to be evaluated individually to decide whether it’s a game of chance or not.

Although often used as a good example for loot boxes, «Overwatch» is now also one of the culprits.

Let’s get away from video games and take a look at other games; «Magic the Gathering» cards or Panini stickers for instance. Aren’t these also comparable to loot boxes? You buy a set of stickers for a certain price and you get five random stickers, each with a football player on it? Depending on how rare a certain sticker is, it’s worth more or less money. No sticker is worth a fortune, but there’s a value to them. «In this case, the element of gain is missing, which is needed for a game to be classified as a game of chance. Panini stickers can be sold or traded, but they don’t allow you to make a monetary gain directly from the seller,» Saraceni responds.

Game developers therefore have nothing to fear from the Swiss authorities for the time being. However, Saraceni points out that the SFGB will continue to keep a close eye on the developments in the gaming industry. «Should specific reasons appear that constitute any violation of the Federal Act on Games of Chance and Casinos, we will intervene.» It can be assumed that this discussion will be fought out on the political stage.

What’s next after loot boxes?

Almost all good skins in «PUBG» are only available from fee-based loot boxes.

A ban on all loot boxes is sure to have serious consequences for the gaming industry. Especially for free-to-play games, as loot boxes are often the only source of income. What’s the alternative? Going back to the old system where you’d buy a full-price game and, in exceptional cases, pay for an add-on, is unlikely. Micro transactions and the such are too lucrative to make this possible. The gaming industry is growing every year and generated over 100 million dollars in revenue in 2017.

Although the mobile segment has seen the strongest growth, console and PC games have not been sleeping either. The industry is sure to find a way to keep us to paying well beyond actually purchasing a game. How? All I can do is guess. What do you think? Will loot boxes disappear and if so, what will be next?

These articles might also interest you

<strong>Nintendo Labo</strong>: a successful experiment
video
GamingReview

Nintendo Labo: a successful experiment

User

Philipp Rüegg, Zurich

  • Teamleader Odin
Being the game and gadget geek that I am, working at digitec and Galaxus makes me feel like a kid in a candy shop – but it does take its toll on my wallet. I enjoy tinkering with my PC in Tim Taylor fashion and talking about games on my podcast . To satisfy my need for speed, I get on my full suspension mountain bike and set out to find some nice trails. My thirst for culture is quenched by deep conversations over a couple of cold ones at the mostly frustrating games of FC Winterthur.

108 comments

3000 / 3000 characters

User Anonymous

Hoffentlich kommts auch in die Schweiz...

09.05.2018
User BeartigerMensch

Geiler Avatar :D

09.05.2018
User Anonymous

lol yepp.. dacht schon.. wut? wieso muss der so lange laden? XD

30.05.2018
Answer
User _saem_

Ich vermeide mittlerweile Spiele, bei denen Microtransactions vorkommen, die nur dazu da sind, das Spiel spielbarer zu machen. Ich bezahle gerne für ein super Spiel, aber nur einmal. Ich würde für ein super Game sogar einmalig anstatt 60.- bis zu 100 Stutz bezahlen.

09.05.2018
User Anonymous

Und ich erinnere mich, wie in den 80ern und 90ern Games noch 80-130 Franken gekostet haben...

12.05.2018
User Misch_86

Vor 10 Jahren hat man für PS3 games immer 90-100 Franken bezahlt...

13.05.2018
User ExtraTNT

Also ich habe nichts gegen lootboxen, echt Geld einsätze, usw. solange das Spiel ohne dies gut spielbar ist bin ich dabei... leider sieht heute alles ein bisschen anders aus... ich kenne aber ein Spiel (free2play) beidem man genau sieht wer gezahlt hat, der der einfach den skill für das was er und halt auch seine gegner hat nicht aufbringen kann... also es gibt noch heute games die ohne echt Geld besser zu zocken sind als mit... (mein Senf (mit Mayo (und Curry)))

14.05.2018
User joel.t.waelti

Ich stimme ExtraTNT zu. Ich habe rein gar nichts gegen Lootboxen in Spielen SO LANGE ES NICHT PAY-TO-WIN IST. OW ist ein perfektes Beispiel in dem Lootboxen super sind: Man bekommt sie ziemlich einfach durch spielen, sie bringen einem nicht den geringsten Vorteil im Spiel und man bekommt nicht oft doppelte Items/bekommt Währung, wenn es passiert. Ich finde nichts schlechtes daran.

16.05.2018
User ExtraTNT

Und auch wenn man einen kleinen vorteil durch lootboxen hat... zb waffenupgrade 56 -> 58 schaden, dann ist das alles in bester Ordnung.
Aber wenn durch ne lootbox der grösste noob ein pro ohne weiteres killen kann dann nein danke... Ich meine Spieleentwickler brauchen auch Geld, aber wenn dadurch Leute leiden die nicht lootboxen kaufen... wenn das Game 10.- oder 20.- mehr kostet und lootboxen nur kleine oder keine Vorteile bringen sind alle glücklicher... (darum mag ich Crossout, wer zahlt verliert)

16.05.2018
Answer
User Axonteer

Ich habe für mich selbst gemerkt, dass spiele mit künstlichem Grind in jedweder form (wozu auch lootboxen gehören) wo man konstant sein "defizit" aufgezeigt bekommt eher deprimierend und demotivierend sind. Daher kaufe ich sie nicht mehr. Doppelter Profit für mich, keinen für die Hersteller!

09.05.2018
User Sensenmaa

Seid diese microtransactions in Spiele implementiert worden sind, habe ich einfach Stück für Stück das zocken aufgegeben.
Heute spiele ich lieber mal wieder Karten oder gehe in die Spielstatt und schau was es dort so gibt. Mir tut es gut damit aufzuhören zu meinem Portemonnaie auch, so konnte ich mir auch die sehr teuren Computer Komponenten sparen :D

09.05.2018
User Sensenmaa

Autokorrektur :D ist schon was blödes.

09.05.2018
Answer
User MatthiasBarth

Ich sehe das Problem von Lootboxen vor allem darin, dass man während dem spielen Lootboxen quasi auf dem Silbertablett als Reward bekommt. Das öffnen kostet dann aber zwei Stutz. Wenn man sie nicht öffnet, liegen sie im Inventar rum und lachen dich jedes mal an, wenn man den Inventar checkt.

09.05.2018
User Misch_86

du kannst die Lootboxen im Steam store verkaufen, nicht?
Dann kannst du die Spielsucht anderer dazu ausnutzen, Geld zu verdienen...

Und die CH-Behörden kümmert das nicht, weil der Hersteller dir dafür ja kein Geld zahlt. ^.^

13.05.2018
User MatthiasBarth

Teilweise möglich, teilweise aber auch nicht.
Beispielsweise bei CS:GO ist dies möglich. Allerdings würde ich die 2 Rappen welche man dafür erhält nicht als "Geld verdienen" bezeichnen. :D
Bei Rocket League können die Lootboxen allerdings nicht verkauft werden.

13.05.2018
Answer
User Am1no

guter Artikel Philipp ! Bin gespannt wie sich das alles entwickelt... Aber ja grundsätzlich gibt es dieses System ja mit MTG seit über 20 Jahren schon...

09.05.2018
User -Spooky-

Bei MtG kann ich Karten tauschen oder gg. Wert auch handeln. Klar werden bei CS:Go auch die Skins verkauft, aber eben ..

09.05.2018
User Anonymous

Die Karten gehören aber im Unterschied zu den meisten digitalen Items dir.

10.05.2018
Answer
User Lynx_

Man könnte es so versuchen das Items die nur einen Sammlerwert haben (Weil sie nur optischen Nutzen haben) und dadurch ein eher persönlichen Wert und keinen Effekt auf das Gameplay haben durch Lootboxen erworben werden können. Effektive Items jedoch nicht da sich ihr wert klar beziffern lässt.

09.05.2018
User bachmasa

Das erste macht OV bereits so.
Das zweite ist pay to win, was so ziemlich das grösste no go bei spielen mit competitivem geist ist.

09.05.2018
User Lynx_

Es gibt hier einige Systeme:
1. Echtes Geld -> Effektive Items (PayToWin)
2. Echtes Geld -> Optische Items
3. Echtes Geld -> Lootboxen -> Effektive Items (PayToWin)
4. Echtes Geld -> Lootboxen -> Optische Items
Ich dachte das 3. Vielleicht verboten werden könnte ohne das 4. Verboten wird.

10.05.2018
User Anonymous

Das Problem ist, dass die Hersteller dabei nur ein Ziel haben; dem Gamer möglichst viel Geld aus der Tasche zu saugen. Brauchen tut das ja wirklich keiner um zu spielen. Denn z.G. ist wenigstens P2W verpönt. Fair ist nur "2. Echtes Geld -> Optische Items". So verdient man aber nur einen 0.00%Teil.
Das Case open Video sagt eigentlich alles. Verbesserung würde immer heissen, dass es nicht im Sinne des Herstellers sein wird.
Gesetze!? - Go for it! Sonst lässt die Saugkraft nie nach ;)

10.05.2018
User Anonymous

PS: Wenn wir schon dabei sind, könnte man auch gleich das Zahnbürstli(Köpfe), Drucker(Patronen), Kafee(Kapseln), usw -problem auch gleich lösen.

10.05.2018
User Anonymous

Stimmt, aber andererseits sind diese Sachen nun wirklich kein Glücksspiel. Man weiss jederzeit was man fürs Geld bekommt.

11.05.2018
Answer
User _tdc_

Alternative?? keine Lootboxen dafür wieder mit LAN Modus, dann braucht es auch keine Server mehr und die Spiele können auch in 10/20/30 Jahren noch gespielt werden!

11.05.2018
User redae899

Lootboxen sind gefährlich. Jedoch sollten diese nicht unter den Begriff des Glücksspiels fallen. Man kriegt immer einen Gegenwert für das bezahlte Geld, was im Casino nicht der Fall ist. Dort "erwirbt" man lediglich die Möglichkeit Geld zu gewinnen. Es sollte eine neue Regelung für Lootboxen geben.

09.05.2018
User redae899

Super Beitrag übrigens!

09.05.2018
User Paescu1996

Das Problem dabei.
Der Spieler zahlt das Geld oftmals ein, weil er ein spezifischen Gegenstand will. Dieser erhält er jedoch nur selten, was den schwächeren der Spielerschaft zu immer grösseren Investitionen führt.

Dies ist wohl so die niederste Art der Mikrotransaktionen, und gehört verboten.

09.05.2018
User iceteapeach

@ Redae899 "Man kriegt immer einen Gegenwert für das bezahlte Geld, was im Casino nicht der Fall ist." Der Gegenwert ist gleich 0 EURO,CHF, Dollar. Kannst mir gerne erleutern was genau der Gegenwert ist. Was sind die Skins Wert? Einzig die guten CS.GO Skins könnten einen Wiederverkaufswert haben. Aber alles andere sind nur Bits/Bytes und kann nicht verkauft werden. Noch schlimmer als im Casino, wo man wenigstens die Chance hat Cash zu gewinnen.

09.05.2018
User Tr3l4m

Bei Lootboxen hat man genau die selbe Chance etwas zu gewinnen wie im Casino, ich sehe das Problem nicht

10.05.2018
Answer
User quinxx12

Das einzig vernünftige ist wohl, dass man die Skins direkt kaufen kann, also dass der Preis völlig klar von den Entwicklern festgelegt wird wie bei LoL. Allerdings stellt sich dann die Frage, was dann mit den Communitymärkten wie bei csgo passieren wird. Was bestimmt dann den Wert der Dragon Lore?

09.05.2018
User Mactteo

Entweder würde Valve sich mit den grossen 3rd Party Organisationen auseinander setzen und faire Preise bestimmen, so dass diejenigen die die Skins schon haben keinen Unterschied/Verlust haben. Oder..... Valve setzt den Preis einer Dragon Lore FN auf 300$ und fertig ist, CSGO-Wirtschaftschaos!

22.05.2018
Answer
User stetwig

Lootboxen, die nur kosmetische Artikel (wie in CS:GO und RL) bieten finde ich nicht so tragisch. Da ist es jedem selber überlassen und man hat keinen Vorteil.
Sobald es um Spielinhalt geht wie neue Waffen oder sonstige neue Inhalte, sollten Lootboxen verboten werden.

11.05.2018
User JTR.ch

Warframe zeigt wie man F2P ohne Lootboxen macht. Du weisst immer was du gegen Echtgeld kaufst. Das System könnte auch Einzug finden. Ich habe einiges Geld in Warframe gesteckt, ich würde aber nie Lootboxen kaufen, genau weil man nicht weiss was man bekommt.

09.05.2018
User thomasbaumann1993

Weg mit den Sche......Lootboxen Als Entwickler und zocker würde ich ein solches Gesetz gut finden

13.05.2018
User lol-lukas-schwab

Nur teilweise wie @01andiplayz schon geschrieben hat. Ohne ingame vorteil nach dem kauf sind lootboxen komplett ok. Über Altersbe

15.05.2018
User lol-lukas-schwab

Über Altersbeschränkungen kann man diskutieren.

15.05.2018
User ExtraTNT

Also ich finde es gut, auch mal etwas zu kaufen um die entwickler zu unterstützen, aber wenn man kaufen muss ummithalten zu können, -> ne danke... zb würde ich fürn gutes game gerne mal was ingame kaufen sagen wir 20.- (wird wohl schnell mal mehr als 50.- aber egal)
, wäre im genau gleichen game der „zwang“ etwas für 10.- zu kaufen, so hätte ich gar keinen bock drauf... -> am schluss haben die genau 10.- von mir, anders 20.-, eher 50.- (wenn ich dann mal geld habe... ;) )

06.06.2018
Answer
User 01andiplayz

Ich persönlich sehe kein Problem in Lootboxen, solange keine Pay-to-win-Items vergeben werden. Der Kaufzwang für den Spieler in vielen Games sehe ich als weitaus grösseres Problem.
Fifa beispielsweise zwingt einen nach dem Kauf für 70.- im Ultimate Team fast zum Lootbox-Kauf um mithalten zu können.

15.05.2018
User Sandro88

Wenn nun die Lootboxen laut Schweizer Gesetzt illegal wären und das Geldspielgesetz angenommen wird, müssten dann diese Firmen per Netzsperren geblockt werden?

08.05.2018
User Philipp Rüegg

Dieses Beispiel hab ich oben ebenfalls beschrieben. Allerdings wäre es vorstellbar, dass bei der Schweiz, die nicht zur EU gehört, möglicherweise tatsächlich eine Sonderlösung gefunden würde. Gut möglich, dass es sich nämlich nicht lohnt, nur für uns das Spielsystem anzupassen. Aber wie gesagt, da die Spiele bereits im Handel sind, kann ich es mir fast nicht vorstellen, dass man sie so leicht vom Markt nehmen kann.

09.05.2018
User f0rky

Genau, nur schon das Ausmass bei CS:GO wäre ja richtig heftig. Da würde ja richtig viel Geld von Gamern verloren gehen, also diejenigen die man mit so einem Gesetz schützen will würden erst mal alles verlieren. Ich habe schon beim letzten CS:GO Wettspiel Skandal meine Skins verkauft....

09.05.2018
Answer
User swiss_brodi

Guter Artikel mir scheint aber vielen ist nicht klar wieviel heutzutage es kostet ein Triple A game zu produzieren und server zu warten etc.. Ich sehe höchstens als alternative zu Lootboxen heutzutage das Spiele wieder teurer werden in den 90er waren Sie ja zum Teil 20-30 Franken teurer als heute.

09.05.2018
User zilti

Ich kann mich nicht erinnern, dass PC-Spiele mehr als 76.- gekostet hätten, selbst in den 90ern nicht.

09.05.2018
User Fleuru

oder man macht das man wie be World of warcraft jeden Monat zahlen muss. irgendwie müssen die Server ja Bezahlt werden.

09.05.2018
User Anonymous

Zilti, für Games zahlte man in den 80ern/90ern gut 80.- (Durchschnitt für Amiga/Atari/MS-DOS) bis 130.- (Durchschnitt für SNES) Franken. Wer ein Neo-Geo hatte, sogar bis 300 Franken für ein Game...

12.05.2018
Answer
User earthnuts

Habe in CSGO mit Crates öffnen schon seit mehr als 12 Monaten aufgehört. Doch in Rocket League bin ich immernoch "süchtig". Sobald ich einer der neuen Crate bekomme, mache ich es sofort auf. Ist ja nur ca. CHF1.- pro Schlüssel. Doch bis jetzt habe ich locker über 200 Crates geöffnet.

09.05.2018
User Silvio.Fontevivo

Bei RL wird das Geld wenigstens in den Cup gesteckt und nicht in die eigene Tasche. Finde ich einen guten Ansatz.

09.05.2018
User Sebastard

Geht mir gleich, übrigens bei Rainbow six siege geht es auch in den E-Sport, wenn man etwas kauft.

09.05.2018
User Paescu1996

Sebastard
Läge wohl eher im Interesse der Spielerschaft, wenn sie es in die Server oder Bugfixing Investieren würden.
Für Ubisoft ist die ESL/Competitive eher Marketing, schließlich stehen die Gamer ja auf ESL Shooter, auch wen weder die Engine noch Infrastruktur dafür ausreichend sind. Wen ich für jeden nicht gezählten Kopfschuss, jeden Glitcher und jeden Highpinger 1CHF erhalten würde müsst ich wohl nicht mehr arbeiten gehen.

09.05.2018
Answer
User dario

Das Leben würde wieder Sinn machen und bitte auch noch gerade ein DLC Verbot damit Entwickler Studios nicht das 3x oder 4x Fache für ein Game verlangen können nur damit wie z.B. in Forza alle Autos fahren kann.

09.05.2018
User buzzware

ich denke das Hauptproblem ist eher, dass gewisse Seiten wie csgofast ein glückspiel draus machen. Da geht es zu wie im Casio. Schwarz oder Rot (rollet usw.) wo man für richtige treffer Punkte bekommt und somit die Punkte zu Skins eingetauscht werden können. Das ist Geldmacherei und das will das Land verbieten

12.05.2018
User ricci78

Solange nur kosmetische Items in den Lootboxen sind, hab ich kein Problem damit.

13.05.2018
User Sebastard

Ich habe früher bestimmt schon in den FIFA Teilen 14-17 400 Fr. ausgegeben. In Rocket League vielleicht 200 Fr. Hochgerechnet ist das schon echt viel Geld, dass Problem dabei ist, dass das purer Scam ist.

09.05.2018
User iceteapeach

Ich hab in Hearthstone sicher schon um die 1k verlocht. Bis ich aufgehört habe und das Game deinstalliert.

09.05.2018
Answer
User eichof99

Warum sollte man diese per Gesetz verbieten? Gesetze der Gesetze willen? Es ist jedem seine Verantwortung ob er solche Spiele kauft oder nicht.

12.05.2018
User Intarisgmbh

Wenn Lootboxen ein "Glücksspiel" sind sind es auch Pokemon Karten, Magic Karten, Panini Bilder usw auch.

15.05.2018
User HenriMütze

hmmm... meiner meinung nach sollten loot-boxen nicht verboten werden. Ich ände es gerechtfertigt, wenn man hinweise darauf machen würde dass es evt. süchtig machen kann und die funkion sollte evt. auch ab 18 sein, oder auch das gesamte spiel dadurch ab 18.

15.05.2018
User DraftDario

Bonjour,
Concernant l'article de loi suisse:
"...la chance de réaliser un gain en argent ou d'obtenir un autre avantage matériel...", peut-on vraiement considérer les loot boxes comme un "avantage MATÉRIEL" ? Le digital est-il officielement défini comme matériel ?
À réfléchir...

18.05.2018
User Anonymous

Die Lootbox wird nicht verschwinden. Der Inhalt kann ja immer wieder neu angepasst werden. Und wenn der Spieler "nur" sehr begehrte Skins rausgebekommt, welche nicht handelbar sind, wird kein Gesetz der Welt etwas dagegen halten können.
Dafür werden dann Skins teuer im Ingameshop verkauft.

10.05.2018
User Snbider

Für alles, was man in Games untereinander handeln kann, gibt es auch inoffizielle Spielcasinos.
Somit gibt es hier eine Glücksspielproblematik.

10.05.2018
User Anonymous

WWE Supercard! Teure "Packs" mit grossen versprechen... bekommt aber blos "schrot"

10.05.2018
User Misch_86

Der Staat sollte sich des enormen Potentials für Einnahmen bewusst werden. Werden sämtliche Lootboxen als Glücksspiel definiert, müssen Spielehersteller eine entsprechende Abgabe entrichten und der Staat kann mächtig verdienen.

13.05.2018
User Misch_86

Damit würde man auch noch Jugendliche schützen, da diese Spiele konsequent ab 18 verkauft (unter strengeren Kontrollen) und mit einem expliziten Warnhinweis versehen werden müssten (sodass die Eltern ihren Kiddies nicht mehr jedes Spiel einfach so kaufen).

Mikrotransaktionen, wo für echtes Geld direkt optische Veränderungen gekauft werden können, finde ich okay. Alles, was irgendwie dazu führt, dass ein Zufallsprinzip mit echtem Geld verknüpft wird, gehört verboten!

13.05.2018
Answer
User meninosousa

as micro transactions also exist since long time and are also a big problem between teenagers, all come to the question of education. this will be hard to remove everywhere so it's a question of how each individual will deal with this matter. i'm sure that if no one buys loot boxes, all the major companies will stop this way of earning money

14.05.2018
User DigiMermar

Wenigstens dient die ganze Diskussion dazu, dass die Boxen transparenter werden. Am Beispiel von NFS: No Limits sieht man deutlich, wie EA bzw. Firemonkeys die Boxen geändert haben und nun transparent machen, was man gewinnen könnte. Es gibt Listen mit allem Inhalt, was möglich wäre.

15.05.2018
User DigiMermar

Und es gibt Boxen, die einen garantierten Gewinn enthalten. Die sind zwar richtig teuer, aber man bekommt auch das, was drauf steht.
Dennoch: Ich wäre auch dafür, wieder 50 - 100 Stutz für ein Game auszugeben, und das dann aber durchspielen zu können. Ansonsten summieren sich die kleinen Böxchen schnell auf einen ansehnlichen Betrag.
Was sind so Eure Beträge, die Ihr für Boxen ausgebt? 100.-? 1000.-? Oder noch mehr?

15.05.2018
User Anonymous

ich hab in etwa 5 Jahren etwa CHF 50.- dafür ausgegeben.
Der Inhalt war aber sehr enttäuschend.
Muss die Schlüssel zu den Lootboxen auch nicht zwingend kaufen, da ich diese begrenzt (timegatet) Ingame farmen kann.

17.05.2018
User tho22

Ich gehe davon aus, dass gewisse Games in Zukunft dann nur noch als Abo zu haben sein werden. Sieht man ja auch bei der Software (Stichwort Creative Cloud...). Wenn du dann nicht nehr zahlst, kannst du auch nicht mehr zocken. Dann wäre die Möglichkeit da, verschiedene Abo-Modelle anzubieten. So gibt es vielleicht nur beim teuersten Abo sämtliche Spielmodi... Ob das dann in eine bessere Richtung geht als aktuell, wage ich zu bezweifeln. Denn so werden schlussendlich alle bestraft. Andererseits lässt sich aktuell ein Modus meiden oder halt nur bescheiden mitzuspielen.

20.09.2018
Answer