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Inspiration

My coming out: I love dumbphones

I’m testing the Nokia 3310 at the moment. I know this is unusual and I feel obliged to explain myself, as I might be the only tech editor out there who’d chose a dumbphone over a smart one any day.

Today’s the day that to let the world know: I’m asophophonophile (pseudo-Greek for asophos «unwise, foolish», phone «telephone» and philia «friendship»). I’m not attracted to smart, intelligent phones, but to dumb, primitive ones. I first realised this a while back and I haven’t been converted since, despite all the well-intended efforts from those around me. Please accept me the way I am.

Dumbphone pornography

My asophophonophily

Over the years, I came up with many excuses why right then wasn’t the best time to get a smartphone. Initially, this was easy, as smartphones used to cost a small fortune and didn’t have a lot of functionality. The first ever iPhone wasn’t even available in Switzerland for over a year and it didn’t feature 3G. Other smartphones weren’t doing any better; they ran on Windows Mobile 6.1 and the screen only reacted if you pushed your finger into it as hard as you could. It was awful. But the good thing was that I could happily be with my dumbphone without attracting attention, even around techies.

Then it all changed. By 2010 at the latest, even Android smartphones were decent devices. But they left me unaffected. When Samsung launched the Galaxy S, they held a gigantic show in the Hallenstadion in Zurich and showed us all how this smartphone was going to be their our one and only companion in any life situation. I remember standing there, staring blankly at the screen and thinking that wasn’t the kind of life I’d ever want to live. Turns out that I – possibly joined by a handful of stick-in-the-mud grandpas – was alone with this thought.

And then the impossible happened: Smartphones didn’t only become usable, but also affordable. This left me with less, but still more than enough good reasons not to get on: They collect personal data, their batter life is crap, the screen is fragile and worst of all, they’re addictive. There are more than enough junkies out there who can’t even put their phone away to get off the train, who’d rather be run over by a bus than missing what’s happening on their screen and who don’t know what’s happening or how to react if a real person in the real life talks to them in a real voice. Welcome to the Dark Side!

I tried, but it just felt wrong

It was in the year 2015 that I gave in and bought a smartphone. Not even a cheap one; I got myself a Yotaphone 2. I swear I tried to live up to society’s expectations, but it just didn’t work out. After a few weeks of torture, I sold my smartphone and returned to my Nokia. You can’t imagine how relieved I was. I knew the Nokia era was coming to an end ever since they were bought up by Microsoft. But I was prepared: The truth is, I didn’t have one Nokia, I had three. «Till death us do part», I thought. This was how I became a prepper, gearing up for the telecommunication apocalypse.

The supply bottleneck of Nokia phones was foreseeable – and I was prepared.

If there’s no other way, it will work out

But it wasn’t meant to be. By that time, I was surrounded with heavy addicts. And you know what junkies are like: They can’t stop even though they know it’s not doing them any good. Smartphones are the cause of all evil: Secret services are spying on everyone and tapping right into major data suppliers, innocent citizen’s flats are stormed in the middle of the night and people are kept at airports and questioned for hours only because of a silly joke they made on Twitter. But my junkie friends couldn’t care less. They were still nagging at me and urging me to sign up to WhatsApp. “With WhatsApp, you can arrange dates”, they said. As if human race had been unable to do so before WhatsApp. There was and still is e-mail, SMS, Doodle and even encrypted messengers, but my friends insisted on WhatsApp. I had the choice: Either give in or lose all my friends.

So, I gave in. I bought a Samsung Galaxy A3, the previous year’s model, for 199.–. I got along better with this thing than I did with my first smartphone. What helped me a lot was a setting called “Ultra power saving mode”, which turned it into a dumbphone at the touch of a button. I also put it in a case, to make sure the screen wouldn’t break. This way, even I can live with a smartphone.

The Nokia 3310 – at last I can be my true self

It took me a while to come to terms with the idea that I’d never have a dumbphone again, but I got used to this though. What was when I was asked to test the Nokia 3310. The new edition. It’s not exactly as the original, but it appears to be a pure dumbphone: It’s small, pretty, honest, reliable and uncomplicated. I’ll write about the results of my test in about a week’s time, so check out this space if you’d like to know whether my first impression of the Nokia 3310 is true.

Isn’t it just beautiful?

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Nokia ist zurück – mit drei Stock-Android-Smartphones

3310 (2.40", 0.02GB, Dual SIM, 2MP, Dark Blue)
CHF 59.–
Nokia 3310 (2.40", 0.02GB, Dual SIM, 2MP, Dark Blue)
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David Lee

Durch Interesse an IT und Schreiben schon früh (2000) im Tech-Journalismus gelandet. Mich interessiert, wie man Technik benutzen kann, ohne selbst benutzt zu werden. Meine Freizeit ver(sch)wende ich am liebsten fürs Musikmachen, wo ich mässiges Talent mit übermässiger Begeisterung kompensiere.

27 comments

User Nebucatnetzer

Cooler Artikel. Ich mag mein Smartphone zwar oft gerne allerdings gibt es schon Momente wo ich mir Gedanken über meinen Umgang damit mache. Auch der Satz in deiner Beschreibung "Mich interessiert, wie man Technik benutzen kann, ohne selbst benutzt zu werden." kann ich sehr gut nachvollziehen.

19.09.2017
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User paleopower17

Bon article, intéressant de la voir promu sur un site de vente électronique principalement.
Ce genre de vision, ne doit pas être isolée évidemment, voilà pourquoi c'est une bonne chose aujourd'hui que les constructeurs s'intéresse encore au feature phone mais dans une version revue et améliorée de ceux-ci grâce aux progrès techniques réalisés. Je pense notamment au nouveaux Flipphones de Samsung qui propose une approche hybride.

05.10.2017
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User MakeAppsNotWar

"wo ich mässiges Talent mit übermässiger Begeisterung kompensiere." -David Lee, mag moderne Technologie nicht, arbeitet aber in der Branche.


Mit dem im CV kriegste jeden Job :D

20.09.2017
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User Aurel Stevens

Vielen Dank für den Hinweis! Ich habe David auf dem Radar!

20.09.2017
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User Canavar

Will it blend? That is the question!

20.09.2017
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User GarminAsus

*bend

22.09.2017
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User Canavar

nein **blend

22.09.2017
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User Anonymous

ich persönlich vermisse vorallem E.161, schade das die Option bei keinem Smartphone geboten wird. Die Blackberry Tastaturen sind da leider auch keine Alternative. Man war einfach viel schneller beim tippen, vorallem musste man nicht drauf schauen um zu schreiben.

20.09.2017
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User rhth34tzrh5666

Nokia E55 ist ein perfektes kompromiss telefon. es geht eigentlich nur skype und whatsapp, symbian ist eine krankheit, aber der akku schaft easy 2 wochen.

20.09.2017
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User ChriZ86

Und jetzt stell dir mal vor warum diese Handy 2 Wochen durchhalten ? na ? Das Display bei Smartphones generien denn höchsten Stromverbrauch

20.09.2017
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User fumo

ja, liegt ausschliesslich am bösen Display. Nicht am Zusammenspiel von Display, CPU, mehrere, gleichzeitig laufende Funkstandards, Hintergrundtasks, etc....

20.09.2017
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User Anonymous

Dir ist aber schon bewusst das dass erste iPhone doch WLAN hatte? 3G hatte es nicht, WLAN jedoch schon.

20.09.2017
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User Anonymous

Ohne WLAN wäre wohl schon ein bisschen problematisch gewesen ^^

20.09.2017
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User David Lee

Ups. Korrigiert.

20.09.2017
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User XXXXXX

Schöner Artikel. Ich dachte nur Kriminelle benutzen diese alten Handys noch^^ wieder was gelernt

20.09.2017
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User MakeAppsNotWar

Wer weiss... David Lee willste was sagen?

20.09.2017
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User Fixed-Bearing

Ähnlich ergeht es dir, wenn du um alles in der Welt dein Windows Phone nicht hergeben willst. Da gibt es ja keine Apps usw.
Jetzt schreib ich mir die Apps halt in Visual Studio selbst und kombiniere nach Belieben mit Raspberry Pi IoT's, welche ich auch gleich selbst baue.

21.09.2017
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User RetoBarbon

Also im allgemeinen liebe ich die Artikel Deines Kollegen Bärlocher, Aber das Zeug von der IAA war total Egozentrisch, es ging vorwiegend um viel Arbeitsstunden. Ich muss nun sagen, mit diesem Artikel leuchtet mir ein neuer Stern am Digitec Himmel. Lese alles dank IPhone7 aber ich freue mich schon..

24.09.2017
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User Grendizr

As a Software Engineer who even already worked on iOS app. I managed never to had one smart-thing and I'll try to keep it this way. To be honest I don't use my phone so much, but hey .. that's just a phone !
Recently I was forced to change my 2G phone because of the lack network provider support.

20.09.2017
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User Grendizr

I selected my "new" dumbphone based on what ? the SAR level of course.

I used this useful website to do so handystrahlung.ch/sar.php and ended up with a not well known "Kazam Life B7" which is quite handy and does the job quite well.

The best part is the head SAR value is quite ridiculous compared to any smartphone ... specially iPhones which act like a crazy power plant in your pocket.

Thumbs up Asophophonophilio-nados !

20.09.2017
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User amigafreak

You cannot create a good product if you don't use it!

21.09.2017
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User Fixed-Bearing

Moment ... wurde nicht der Apfel Steve zu seinem iPad von einem Journalist gefragt, ob sich seine Kinder denn darüber (iPad) freuen würden und er antwortete, dass die (seine Kinder) keines haben werden ...

21.09.2017
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User juerg.marty

Super Angebot das Nokia 3310. Frage : ich habe gehört das Betriebssystem kann in der Schweiz nicht genutzt werden. Stimmt das. Ich selber bin ein altmodischer Handybetreiber und funktioniere mit den alten herkömmlichen dumbs und bleibe auch dabei. .

03.10.2017
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User David Lee

juerg.marty: Das Nokia 3310 funktioniert selbstverständlich auch in der Schweiz.

03.10.2017
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