You're not connected to the Internet.
Corporate logo
ComputingBusiness customersReview 3517

MacBook Pro mid-2018: great device with a few niggles

Each year, Apple skips a MacBook Pro series update. The latest to launch is the mid-2018 version and I’ve just put it to the test. Read on to find out if it’s worth the hefty price tag.

Who’d have thought it? You go on holiday for two weeks and come back to work to find the brand spanking new MacBook Pro waiting for you. I could think of worse scenarios. In that way I’m totally unlike my colleague Martin Jud, who’d rather do yoga with cows than roadtest a Mac. Thanks, Martin, for leaving all the fun for me.

But it’s not just any old version that’s sitting on my desk. Product management have left me the 3,199 franc model (price: 2 August 2018). That’s the fastest one you can get on digitec. If you want anything faster, you need to buy it direct from Apple. But then it starts to get really expensive. The most expensive configuration will set you back more than 7,400 Swiss francs (price: 2 August 2018).

Devices direct from Apple HQ in Silicon Valley have always cost more than those from competitors. Compared with the ZenBook Pro, which comes with similar components, my test MacBook cost 900 francs more.

  • MacBook Pro Space Grey (15.40", Retina, Intel Core i7-8850H, 16GB, SSD)
  • MacBook Pro Space Grey (15.40", Retina, Intel Core i7-8850H, 16GB, SSD)
  • MacBook Pro Space Grey (15.40", Retina, Intel Core i7-8850H, 16GB, SSD)
CHF 2765.–was 3199.–1
Apple MacBook Pro Space Grey (15.40", Retina, Intel Core i7-8850H, 16GB, SSD)
Version 2018: This MacBook Pro takes mobility and performance to a new level. Wherever your ideas lead you – with extremely powerful processors and memory, advanced graphics (Radeon Pro 560X) and high-speed memory, you'll get there faster.
7

Availability

  • The delivery date is being clarified with the supplier and will be updated shortly.

Information subject to change.

View details

What exactly is in my test device?

  • Intel Core i7-8850H 2.6 GHz
  • Radeon Pro 560X 4096 MB
  • 16 GB 2400 MHz DDR4
  • 512 GB SSD
  • 15.4-inch Retina display 2880 x 1800 with 220 pixel per inch
  • Touch bar with integrated fingerprint scanner
  • Speakers, microphone and front camera
  • Lithium polymer battery with 83.60 Wh
  • macOS High Sierra

Design and ports

Reliable design: Apple hasn’t made any changes to the casing

Since 2016, nothing has changed about the design. The casing is still made of aluminium, and it seems high-quality and sturdy. As you’d expect from Apple, they don’t add anything fancy for the sake of it. What has also stayed the same is the placement of the cooling fans. They’re still at the back of the MacBook, but as always, you don’t even notice them.

The device comes in at 1.83 kg, is 1.55 cm thick, 24.07 cm long and 34.93 cm wide. This puts it on a par with Windows notebooks.

In this model, Apple continues in its quest to save on ports. You can search high and low for a USB A connection but you’ll be looking in vain. The same goes for a card reader. Having said that, it’s not all bad news. You do get four Thunderbolt 3 ports that are also suitable for all USB C devices. And there’s still a headphone jack. But that’s your lot.

This is just Apple carrying on what it started in the 2016 range. As the owner of a 2017 MacBook Pro, I should probably already know that. But to this day I still can’t get to grips with the fact I always need to cart my hub around.

And that’s coming from me, someone who doesn’t even have a lot of peripheral equipment. I don’t want to think about how much a nuisance it must be for hardcore users trying to hook all their input and output devices up to a new MacBook Pro.

Don’t get me wrong. I get that Apple want to stay on brand and keep design as simple as possible. But when it gets to the extent that brand identity encroaches on the user experience, that’s when I’m not too pleased. If they’re charging a mighty 3,200 francs, I’d at least expect it to come with a hub.

Ports are few and far between.

Display

While the display does look fabulous, it tends to be quite reflective

Behold the 2880 x 1800 pixel resolution retina display based on IPS technology with LED backlight. The glossy image looks great and should let you work with precision colours right out of the box. The MacBook Pro is perfect for graphics-intensive use.

Important side note: if that’s what you intend to use it for, make sure you switch off the true tone mode in the settings first. This automatically adapts the white balance for different light situations. While this might be ideal for office workers, it’s detrimental when you’re trying to edit photos or videos.

Touch bar, keyboard and trackpad

Included in the mid-2018 version is the touch bar that was introduced in 2016. You’ll have to decide for yourself if it makes any sense for you to use it. Personally, I think it’s pretty practical for navigating in Safari. But apart from that, my fingers don’t tend to gravitate towards it. Perhaps that’s because the touch bar is only compatible with certain applications. For instance, it doesn’t work in Chrome.

The touch bar is a nice gimmick but not 100% necessary

As usual, you activate the Siri button above the backspace button on the touch bar. The position of it means I’ve already pressed it a number of times by accident. Fortunately, you can remove this Siri shortcut by going to the keyboard settings. At least then I don’t get Siri babbling on at me. When I do yell impatiently, «I hate you, Siri», it now just replies with a simple, «oh, that’s a shame».

The fingerprint sensor integrated into the power button works seamlessly and gives you extra security while you use it. Sadly, the 2018 series doesn’t come with Face ID, so we’ll still have to hold tight for that.

In terms of keyboard, the latest MacBook Pro comes with the third generation of the butterfly keyboard. Since it was introduced in 2016, this keyboard has come under a deluge of criticism. There are two main issues. First, there’s the question of quality. According to reports, some keys suddenly stop working.

Then there’s the problem of faulty ergonomics. The hey drop is very short if not verging on non-existant. And the keyboard makes a racket when you type. At least Apple managed to improve the noise issue slightly with the latest butterfly generation. According to ifixit.com, there’s now a silicon layer under the keys. But I still have to say the keyboard is comparatively loud.

A nice side effect of the extra rubber suppressing the noise is that less dirt and dust is supposed to get under the keys. Of course, that’s not the real reason for the silicon layer. Personally, I’m not a fan of the butterfly keyboard either. Typing felt nicer on my 2011 MacBook Pro than on the 2017 or 2018 models.

Keyboard and trackpad: the user experience is poles apart

As I see it, the trackpad is one of the reasons for still buying a MacBook Pro. I love how it reacts and does lots of different things with different movements. At 16 x 10 cm, this trackpad is enormous. But believe it or not, it doesn’t get in the way when you’re typing. It’s the complete opposite of the miniscule strokes on the keyboard.

Speakers

What other manufacturers like to hide, Apple flaunts. The speakers in this MacBook Pro are on the left and right hand side of the keyboard. They’re not just there to be seen; they’re there to be heard. If you like to watch films on your laptop, you’re in for a treat. For notebook speakers, they deliver a clean sound. Even in loud action scenes, you can hear the voices clearly. This says it all: I’m yet to find comparable sound quality from notebook speakers for watching films.

The sound from these speakers is outstanding

It’s not just film audio that’s great; sound quality on music is also impressive for a notebook. It’s only when you play songs really loud that the high notes get tinny. Even then, the middle tones and low notes still sound good.

Battery

The 83.6 Wh battery in the new MacBook is more than generous. Apple are quoting a mighty ten hours of battery life. I was quite a long way shy of that in my test. In a day’s normal use of word processing, surfing the net and streaming, my screen time only comes to around eight hours. Charging it up fully takes about an hour and a half.

But you expect more from us in these tests. After all, we’re here to see what these devices can do. That’s why I carried out various tests on the MacBook all at the same time. We want to know how long the laptop can hold out under constant load. I start by stressing the CPU with the yes command in the terminal.

While that’s running, I go on to test the RAM with the MemTest. To make sure the graphics card doesn’t feel left out, I let Cinebench R15’s OpenGL run. And last but not least, I run the Blackmagic Disk Speed Test.

The SSD shows reasonable typing and reading rates

Here’s what happens: the MacBook immediately gets very loud and hot. The programme Fanny shows it has reached 65℃. But it feels a lot warmer than that. Within 50 minutes, there is 50% battery left. I start to worry about reducing the MacBook’s life expectancy if I carry on like this so I stop the test there and then. Having said that, lasting 50 minutes under constant load is a respectable result.

CPU

My test device is home to an Intel Core i7-8850H. Like all new MacBooks with a touch bar, this model now comes with an eighth generation Intel processor. They promise higher performance than previous versions.

In the benchmark Geekbench 4 CPU benchmark, my test device delivers values of 5,000 in the single core test and 20,000 in the multi-core test. This puts the MacBook Pro around 300 points above comparable predecessor models in the single core benchmark and 5,000 when it comes to multi-core.

The increase in performance isn’t significant in the single core test, but the MacBook makes up for it with an impressive result in the multi-core. This also comes down to the fact the MacBook from mid-2017 has a mere quad core processor with eight threads rather than the six core processor in the new machines with 12 threads. You’ll only notice this in processes that use several cores.

But for Apple it wasn’t all plain sailing. They had problems with cooling in the models fitted with i9-processors. That’s why the processor delivered comparably poor results and the issues were resolved in a system update. In the model I tested, I couldn’t spot any changes in the benchmarks as a result of the update.

Graphics card

Apple either builds a Radeon Pro 555X or Radeon Pro 560X into its 15-inch models. My test device has the 560X. In the Cinebench R15 OpenGL test the GPU reaches between 90 and 100 fps. As a result, it falls behind the GTX 1050, which you find in the Asus ZenBook Pro.

In Geekbench 4’s OpenCL benchmark the GPU manages between 60,000 and 65,000. That places it around 20,000 points higher than the Radeon Pro 560 used in the predecessor model. Unlike the results with the processor, the GPU shows a substantial performance increase.

Verdict

Is it worth switching to a new new MacBook Pro? Here’s the non-definitive answer you probably don’t want to hear: it depends.

If your old Pro model looks like it’s getting on a bit, buying a new model would certainly be worth it. Similarly, if you use your laptop for work or you’re an Apple disciple who always needs to have the latest product, this one is for you.

But if your old MacBook Pro is still working fine, you don’t necessarily need to make the switch. The increased performance wouldn’t be significant enough to warrant the purchase – and there hasn’t been a shake-up in the design either. Ever since 2016, Apple has preferred to focus on evolution rather than revolution.

However, I should say it’s not worth having expectations of massive leaps in performance. As I explained, my test device heated up fairly quickly and that’s reflected in performance. I hope Apple works on cooling systems in the next version. Given the trend for ever thinner and lighter portable devices, that’s something of a Herculean task. Let’s see what Apple comes up with. Maybe this will finally be the moment when Apple’s ideology of simple, elegant design gets in its way.

What else should you expect from this new MacBook Pro? You get everything you’ve come to expect from Apple: a high-quality finished product that’s incredibly reliable.

Of course, there are a few snags. There’s the butterfly keyboard for one. It still takes a lot of getting used to. I don’t mean it needs to have a key drop like on mechanical keyboards but a bit more would be appreciated. Only time will tell if the new silicon layer under the keys minimises problems.

The other issue is lack of options when it comes to ports. In this model, Apple continues to offer four Thunderbolt 3s or USB 3.1 C ports. If you want to use any other connectors or cards, you need a hub or a dongle.

There’s also the absence of Face ID as an extra security measure. Why Apple is (still) holding off building it into their MacBooks, I have no idea. To be fair, implementing Siri took them a while. And yet, they’ve had Touch ID on MacBook Pros with the touch bar since 2016. Welcome to 2003.

In spite of these niggles, the MacBook Pro mid-2018 is a very good device I’d recommend to anyone who can afford it and who isn’t totally Mac-averse.

These articles might also interest you

Lenovo Yoga C930 – literally a razor-sharp laptop
ComputingReview

Lenovo Yoga C930 – literally a razor-sharp laptop

MacBook Air 2018: What’s the point of it?
ComputingReview

MacBook Air 2018: What’s the point of it?

User

Kevin Hofer, Zurich

  • Editor
From big data to big brother, Cyborgs to Sci-Fi. All aspects of technology and society fascinate me.

35 comments

3000 / 3000 characters

User Screwface

Kleine Makel? Selbst mit Patch "throttelt" das MBP bei anhaltender Last, wie z.B. Video-/3D-Rendering noch massiv und an heissen Tagen, kann die I9-Version nicht mal den Basis-Takt über längere Zeit halten! Die Kühlung stösst hier klar an ihre Grenzen und das kommt davon, wenn das Chassis immer dünner werden muss und zurückrudern, auf Grund eines übersensiblen Kundenstammes, kann Apple auch nur schwer.

08.08.2018
User Screwface

Abgesehen davon: Spiegelndes Display, RAM/SSD aufgelötet und somit bei Defekt, zum Upgraden, oder aus Gründen der Datenintegrität nicht austauschbar, Akku verklebt, Tastatur genietet und somit insgesamt nicht reparierbar/wartbar. Aber für unfassbar "günstige" 3200.- Fränkli darf man nicht mehr erwarten. Mal schauen, was der finale Test aus NBC sagt. ;-)

08.08.2018
Answer
User daccurda

Empfohlenes Zubehör: Kibernetik TK86L01

08.08.2018
User Mr. Wick

I got that reference

09.08.2018
User Calib4n

What you did there... I see it.

16.08.2018
Answer
User Baaj

Bin ich der einzige der einen Richtigen Lachflash bekam als ich hörte, dass Apple nachdem sie eine (viel zu teure) eGPU auf den Markt gebracht haben und dann MacOS den Support für eGPUs entfernt hat.

youtube.com/watch?v=Q24bItT...

08.08.2018
User HighChargeK

@Baaj sie haben nicht den Support der eGPU aus dem MacOS entfernt. Das ist schlicht weg falsch. Sie haben in FinalCut Pro den eGPU support entfernt. Das ist zwar ein Programm aus dem Hause Apple aber es ist nicht das OS.

08.08.2018
User Mr.Shin-Chan

Und was soll man mit einer egpu dann?
Crysis zocken was es nichtmal offiziell für mac gibt und man rumbasteln muss? Welcher macuser bastelt rum?

09.08.2018
User HighChargeK

eGPUs sindbei Mac noch im Anfangsstadion, das weiss man eigentlich. Aber um deine Frage zu Beantworten, es gibt Programme, die eine eGPU unterstützen wie z.B. DaVinci Resolve (von dem stammt auch die Black Magic eGPU) aber auch Games wie beispielsweise WoW.

09.08.2018
Answer
User raybs1987

Hallo zusammen,
Ich arbeite zur Zeit noch auf einem MacBook Pro 13 (late 2012) und ich stosse in Final Cut Pro und Lightroom echt an meine Grenzen. Ich denke, nun ist die Zeit reif für ein Update. Die Frage ist nur ob ich auf einem 13 oder 15 Zoll weitermachen soll. Ich reise eben auch noch viel...

08.08.2018
User HighChargeK

Kommt halt darauf an, was dir lieber ist. Das 15“ hat eine dezidierte Grafikkarte, was beim Rendern und gewissen Programmen helfen kann. Ist aber auch einen Zacken teurer und schwerer. Wenn du Zuhause einen grossen Monitor hast, udn es dir keine so grosse Rolle spielt, dass ein Video halt mal 3-5min länger hat zum Rendern (je nach Filegrösse), kannst du ja beim 13“ bleiben. Bezüglich dem Prozessor sei noch erwähnt, dass in einigen Videos von Tech Leuten, eher ein i7 Prozessor empfohlen wird als der i9. Das bisschen was der i9 schneller ist als der i7, holt beinahe keiner Raus und man zahlt massiv mehr.

08.08.2018
User Anonymous

Bei Lightroom und Photoshop ist der Prozessor wichtiger. Bei Finalcut die Graka.
Die Frage ist.. was brauchst du eher?
Ich würde das günstigere 15" mit einem i7 nehmen. da hast du einen bessere Prozessor UND eine ausreichende GraKa.
Bin mir auch am überlegen mein 2014er Macbook Pro auszutauschen und tendiere wegen der Photoshpo Auslastung eher zu einem i7 15" Modell

09.08.2018
Answer
User infinityfreak

Was ich nicht verstehen kann warum nur 16GB RAM Versionen im Shop erhältlich sind? Jetzt wo es endlich auch solche mit 32GB RAM gibt.

09.08.2018
User Mr. Wick

Wer braucht den 32GB ? 8GB reichen für 90% der Leute mit ihren Standart gebrauch von Office, Websurfen und Filme schauen aus. 16GB ist also mehr als genug in Sicht auf die Zukunft.
Würde mich aber interessieren welche Programme soviel RAM verschlingen das es deiner Meinung nach nötig ist. Es ist nicht jeder Foto- und Videoeditor.

09.08.2018
User campermate

Digitec und die anderen Online-Händler werden niemals die gleiche Modellvielfalt anbieten können wie Apple (BTO), es werden meist die "Standardkonfiguration" angeboten.

09.08.2018
User infinityfreak

@Mr. Wick aber genau für Video- und Fotobearbeitung würde ich ihn nutzen. Und ich kenne mehrere Fotografen die auch genau diese Konfiguration kaufen werden. Darum bin ich erstaunt, dass nicht ein einziges Modell mit 32GB verfügbar ist. Ich denke das Interesse daran ist grösser als man denkt.

10.08.2018
User Mr. Wick

Wie gesagt, nur wenige haben Programme welche überhaupt 32GB ausnutzen können, daher ist für mehr als nur den Standardnutzer 16GB mehr als genug.
Foto- Video bearbeiten, 3D Modellieren oder Zeichenprogramme benutzen sind dinge welche die wenigsten Leute auf einer so regelmässigen basis tun das sich der Aufpreis lohnt.
Wenn sie nun 32GB en mass einkaufen würde bleiben sie doch nur auf denen sitzen.

10.08.2018
User constantin.drack

@infinityfreak Wenn ich mehrere kleinere Programme offen habe und dazu noch Lightroom schaff ich es nicht die 16 GB zu füllen. Ich glaube kaum dass man als Fotograf 32GB braucht. Wenn es um Videos geht ist das etwas anderst, da hat man sie extrem schnell gefüllt.

16.08.2018
Answer
User Anonymous

"In Chrome funktioniert sie beispielsweise nicht."
Der Chrome hat auch Touchbar Unterstützung. Leider aber nur sehr beschränkt. Gibt Buttons für Vor/Zurück, Favoriten, neuen Tab und einen "Google Balken" mit dem man automatisch in die Adresszeile springt und eine Adresse oder Suche eingeben kann.

09.08.2018
User DenisJG

Excellent test, and one that largely confirms that Apple's portable computer division is on its last legs (breathing only because of a number of naive buyers more interested in expensive clan chic than real performance) and surviving because Windows is such a dumb alternative. Xubuntu on an ASUS...

17.08.2018
User Anonymous

Yeaaa no,, hate to break it to you buddy.. but most Photographers still use a Macbook.. Colors and stability is key for me. My Macbook Pro 13" 2014 is only now getting to its limits due to my new camera..
I don't like my Laptop crashing when iI'm working on a 1.5GB PSD File.. because Win. 10 is crap! And in 4 years this baby has not crashed once.
I need a good screen.. and boy are the screens good. Could buy a Surfacebook, but I'd still be around the price of a Macbook. And worse colors.

03.09.2018
Answer
User constantin.drack

Naja. Ich ziehe dem immer noch ein Zenbook Pro vor. Man bekommt einfach mehr für das Geld.

08.08.2018
User SimiGi

"Bei den Anschlüssen spart Apple wie bereits bei den Vorgängermodellen"
Vier vollwertige Thunderbolt 3 Anschlüsse mit jeweils 40Gbit/s und der Möglichkeit das Gerät über jeden Port zu laden würde ich nicht umbedingt sparen nennen.

09.08.2018
User Mr. Wick

"Bei der Anschlussvielfalt..." wäre die bessere Formulierung gewesen, da haste recht

09.08.2018
Answer
User Anonymous

@Kevin: könntest Du bitte mal per Boot Camp eine Win10 Installation testen? Bei mir bricht das Setup immer bei Punkt (Aktion wird abgeschlossen) ab...
Danke vorab.

09.08.2018
User Mr. Wick

Ein Apple-Internes Dokument das geleaked ist bestätigt das die Silikonschicht dazu da ist um zu verhindern das Schmutz unter die Tasten gelangt.

09.08.2018
User Julien 404

Je ne connaissait pas les processeur quatre cœurs avec huit fils, c'est sur quels modèles ? :-P

21.08.2018
User ThomasKeiser

Dein Mac-Test ist sehr gut verständlich und absolut brauchbar für die Entscheidungsfindung. Ich habe ein Mac-Book Pro 15" late 2008 4GB. Ich denke nun ist die Zeit gekommen dieses auszutauschen. Eigentlich läuft es noch ordentlich aber gemütlich, Batteriebetrieb ca. 1.5 Std. . Soll ich noch ca. 2 bis 3 Monate warten und bei der nächste 15er Pro-Serie einsteigen? Was meinst Du geehrter Verfasser? Ich brauche es hauptsächlich für geschäftliche Zwecke zur Erledigung des Tagesgeschäfte. Fast keine Fotobearbeitung, keine Spiele und nicht für Video oder TV.

22.08.2018
User kamil

macbook? , nein , danke lieber huawei matebook x pro

08.08.2018
User Mr. Wick

pssst.....du musst aufpassen.....zuviele Applesheeps hier die tun dir noch was

09.08.2018
User campermate

Auch als Windows-User und/oder -Sheep würde ich momentan zum MacBook Pro greifen. Die Reviews vom Matebook X Pro sind nun auch nicht gerade berauschend. Ich bin schon lange auf der Suche nach einem Notebook, aber sobald man auf ein gutes Display setzt und auch noch ein leises System haben möchte, kann man ca. 99.5% aller Windows-Kisten in die Tonne treten. Die restlichen 0.5% kosten dann genau so viel die MacBooks. Aber dennoch danke für den Tipp, das X Pro muss ich mal live anschauen.

09.08.2018
User R3lay

Wenn du einen leisen Laptop willst, blockier einfach die Lüfter, ist dann gleich wie ein MacBook.

09.08.2018
Answer