You're not connected to the Internet.
Corporate logo
Home cinemaNew products 1727

LG’s new OLED TVs hit the shelves in June – and I’ve already seen them

The new LG OLEDs feature more processing power, more pictures per second and increased intelligence. I was lucky enough to get a peek at the new line-up coming out this summer.

I had a spring in my step when I headed off to LG’s branch in Dietikon to find out what we can expect from the new OLEDs. I was pretty chuffed, as I was once quoted as saying: «OLED slays it.»

OK, so that might not be the most accurate way of putting it. I mean, just a few years ago, the screen technology we call OLED was still a pie in the sky. But now we are in that much-anticipated future and OLED TVs are taking the market by storm. Senior editor David Lee has already shone a light on that.

What’s so much better about OLED TVs?
Home cinemaKnow-how

What’s so much better about OLED TVs?

And now here I am visiting the branch of an OLED pioneer. This is what happened when I took a nosey around to see what they had to offer this year.

And how I managed to make a difficult decision.

Let’s cut to the chase: what even are OLEDs?

OLEDs have the advantage over LCDs in that the light diodes – also called pixels – light up themselves. They don’t need to be backlit by LEDs. In other words, when there’s black in the image, you are actually seeing black because the pixel in question switches off like a light. That in turn delivers ridiculously good contrast, which is even better depending on how big the difference is between the darkest and brightest pixel. And the better the contrast values, the greater the screen’s colour range.

That’s basically a jargon-heavy way of telling you OLED screens offer good, strong colours. No wonder they’re so popular.

Evolution rather than innovation

Last year LG well and truly teased the maximum brightness out of their OLED displays, as their OLEDs had a reputation for coming second best to LCD screens as far as brightness was concerned. This year the South Korean TV manufacturer focussed on the image processor and image processing. Artificial intelligence is also soon expected to make the device easier to operate.

OLED65E8 (65", 4K, OLED)
A
Energy declaration
A
CHF 4'700.–with money-back guarantee
LG OLED65E8 (65", 4K, OLED)

Availability

  • The delivery date was exceeded

Information subject to change.

View details

OLED65G8 (65", 4K, OLED)
A
Energy declaration
A
CHF 5'999.–with money-back guarantee
LG OLED65G8 (65", 4K, OLED)

Availability

  • approx. 2–3 weeks

If ordered immediately.
Information subject to change.

View details

OLED77C8 (77", 4K, OLED)
A
Energy declaration
A
CHF 9'499.–with money-back guarantee
LG OLED77C8 (77", 4K, OLED)

Availability

Mail delivery

  • 7 piece(s)
    in our warehouse

Heavy product: Delivery to place of use (e.g. cellar, living room) available. Please note: General cargo delivery. Arranged by phone, generally within 1 to 2 days. Delivery to place of use, generally within 7 to 9 days.

Collection

  • Delivery option Collection not available for this product due to its heavy weight.

If ordered immediately.
Information subject to change.

View details

See all 2018 edition OLEDs.

The Alpha 9 processor

The main purpose of Image processors is to calculate and improve video signals from the tuner or the video input channels, such as HDMI ports. Even the best OLED panel is of no use to you if the processor can’t edit the photos cleanly.

It’s not as though LG processors have been useless till now. But in processor wars, Sony is top dog. Or at least, it has been up until recently. The X1 Extreme processor found in its OLED A1 and OLED AF8 propels the Japanese manufacturer to market leader, especially when it comes to noise reduction.

LG is throwing down the gauntlet to Sony with its new processor

LG wants to follow suit with the Alpha 9. According to official sources, the new processor goes through a four-stage process for noise reduction. For context, there used to only be two stages. It also makes the images clearer, and a new algorithm reduces image artefacts and makes contours sharper. On top of that, it’s said to have improved colour rendition, which you notice now in source material with quality below that of Ultra HD, such as normal live TV transmissions or Blu-ray.

You see, a good processor enhances any material that isn’t UHD quality. And that sometimes happens. This is why the processor is at least as important as the screen itself.

HFR – high frame rate

The Alpha 9 has another advantage: high frame rate (HFR). In cinema, one film second is usually made up of 24 single images, known as frames. Because the human eye can’t set each of 24 frames per second apart, it sees it all as one continuous movement.

A high frame rate is when the number of frames or images per second exceeds the customary 24. This makes smooth movements look even smoother. It should mean there is less smearing and choppiness in fast action scenes and sports programmes. Take Peter Jackson’s «Hobbit» saga, for example, which was filmed with 48 images per second.

The Alpha 9 exceeds 48 frames per second (FPS). According to LG, it should be able to handle content with a frame rate of around 120 FPS. Moreover, it automatically makes non-HFR content high. Unless you don’t like the HFR effect, that is, and in which case you can just turn off this setting. Some of LG’s rival disparagingly labelled it the soap effect because that’s what Brazilian soap operas look like.

Artificial intelligence in your TV

The base of the OLED C8V

Samsung set the smart TV bar with its smart home concept and now LG is following suit. Thanks to Google Assistant integration, artificial intelligence should help in a number of ways, especially in controlling the TV via voice commands. Let me give you an example:

«Volume up»

That’s the LG voice command for adjusting the volume. Express it any other way and nothing will happen. LG wants to change that with «ThinQ AI».

The telly should understand «please turn the volume up a bit» just as easily as «hey, I can hardly hear anything here. Give it some welly!»

Artificial intelligence analyses your command and responds accordingly. The bad news is it won’t be ready in time for the launch of Swiss sales. And it could be another five or six months before you’re sweet-talking your TV into recording your favourite cookery programme despite the fact you’re on a diet.

Forecast – what does the future hold for LG and OLED?

This is what true black looks like

Five years ago the battle for the OLED market seemed to be a two-horse race between LG Display, a subsidiary of LG Electronics, and Samsung. But then Samsung backed out. They didn’t reckon the technology would become established, as the organic light-emitting diodes were quick to lose brightness and in any case, they considered them too expensive for the mass market.

Fast-forward to today and the OLED market is the fastest growing area of the TV industry. And possibly also the most lucrative. That’s down to the fact all the manufacturers who offer OLED TVs get their panels – in other words, the screen itself without image electronics and casing – from LG Display. The South Koreans didn’t even consider throwing in the towel and giving up on their research and development.

Technology has them to thank. OLEDs are now supposed to have a lifetime of at least five years, and depending on use, they can last twice as long. It’s hard to give definitive figures as lifetime depends a lot on viewing habits, unless there’s a distinct loss of brightness.

In terms of price, organic diode technology is increasingly coming in line with LCD technology. Obviously, OLEDs are always likely to be at the higher end of that price segment. After all, we are talking about high-end products. But still…

And then it came time for me to make a decision

While I was at the branch, they let me feast my eyes on the 77-inch screen C8V

I cast another glance at the 77-inch monster that goes by the name of C8V. For a brief moment, I let myself envision it in my living room and then rejected the thought almost as soon as it entered my head.

«Hmpf,» I grunt. «It’s too big.»

The LG rep who’s showing me round today asks where my sudden outburst has come from. I explain and he can’t help but crack a smile.

«Two years ago, 55-inch TVs were considered monsters,» he says, «but nowadays the 65-inch ones are our bestsellers. The higher the screen resolution, the bigger the television will be.»

I ponder that idea and think back to how I once described big TVs. In my mind’s eye, I try to picture my living room – while doing a little sum in my head.

Size matters: 3 Gründe, warum sich <strong>grosse TVs</strong> lohnen
Home cinemaInspiration

Size matters: 3 Gründe, warum sich grosse TVs lohnen

And with that I’d come to a decision.

«Can I take it with me?»

These articles might also interest you

<strong>Dolby Atmos</strong> and why it’s the next cinema revolution
AudioKnow-how

Dolby Atmos and why it’s the next cinema revolution

Do it yourself: Building your own <strong>Ambilight</strong>
video
Home cinemaInspiration

Do it yourself: Building your own Ambilight

How <strong>YouTube on a smart TV</strong> can make your life better
Home cinemaKnow-how

How YouTube on a smart TV can make your life better

User
I'm an outdoorsy guy and enjoy sports that push me to the limit – now that’s what I call comfort zone! But I'm also about curling up in an armchair with books about ugly intrigue and sinister kingkillers. Being an avid cinema-goer, I’ve been known to rave about film scores for hours on end. I’ve always wanted to say: «I am Groot.»

17 comments

Please log in.

You have to be logged in to create a new comment.


User JiSiN

Danke Luca,

Schön und gut, aber meiner Meinung nach hast du fast das Wichtigste vergessen :)
Bei den neuen LG (2018) OLED Modellen gibt LG uns zum ersten mal auch BFI (Black Frame Insertion).
Dank BFI kann man bewegungen besser/schöner Darstellen, ohne den unerwünschten SOE (Soap Opera Effect).

27.04.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User beginner99

SOE ist schrecklich. Das erste bei jedem modernen TV ist all diese digitalen Helfer auszuschalten und plötzlich hat man ein gutes Bild...

18.05.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User WaltMuent

Interessanter Blick in LGs Oled Pipeline.
Schade ist, dass am LG Horizont 3D noch nicht wieder sichtbar wird.
Anyway, noch hat LG (je nach Lebensdauer meines aktuellen 65 Zoll 3D Oleds) 5 bis 10 Jahre Zeit diese Technik wieder anzubieten ;-)

28.04.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Anonymous

Inwiefern hat sich die Haltbarkeit des Panels verbessert? Leider wurde das im Artikel fast nicht behandelt. Was nützt mir all diese Bildspielereien und Features wenn ich rechnen muss das er nicht mal meinen aktuellen LCD TV überlebt?
Leider ein wenig sinniger Werbeartikel. Schade....

01.05.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Luca Fontana

Die Frage nach handfesten Infos bezüglich Haltbarkeit brennt uns allen unter den Fingernägeln. Fakt ist, dass Stand heute genaue Angaben sehr schwierig zu machen sind und momentan wirklich niemand genau sagen, wie gut die neuste Generation OLED-Displays nach einigen Jahren im Betrieb aussehen. Dazu kursieren in der Branche zu viele Halbwahrheiten und Unwahrheiten, die teils von den Herstellern selbst gestreut werden. Natürlich incognito.

Glaubst du beispielsweise LG, so hätte man dir vor ein paar Jahren eine Lebensdauer von 36 000 Stunden versprochen, unterdessen sind es sogar 100 000 Stunden. Nun kannst du selber ausrechnen, wie lange dein OLED hält, wenn du vier Stunden pro Tag fernsiehst. Und ob du das glauben möchtest :).

Das andere Problem ist das Einbrennen der Pixels. Zeigt ein OLED zu lange Zeit stets den gleichen Inhalt an, kann sich das Bild einbrennen. Das passiert gerne mal im Fachhandel, wo die TVs ja nicht wie im Alltagsgebrauch das Bild ständig ändern: Eine super Quelle für Missverständnisse.

Aktuelle OLED-Generationen besitzen Funktionen, die ihre Pixels automatisch von selbst erneuern, meist im Hintergrund, wenn der TV nicht benutzt wird. Dafür muss der TV aber am Stromnetz bleiben. Wer sein TV also komplett abschaltet, kommt zu anderen Ergebnissen.

02.05.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User beginner99

36'000 Stunden wäre ja mehr als genug. Das hätte keine alte Röhre geschafft...Bei 4h am Tag wären das 24 Jahre...

18.05.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User andrew428

Der Autor sagt von sich selber, dass er eine Leidenschaft für Kino hat aber zitiert alternative Fakten wie: "Weil 24 Frames pro Sekunde für das menschliche Auge nicht auseinander zu halten sind".

--Traurig, dass hier nun auch noch solche Aussagen verbreitet werden.--

Ansonsten einfach nur ein schwamiger Werbeartikel, ohne irgendwelche spezifischen technischen Details, wie in welcher Auflösung 120Hz akzeptiert werden.

27.04.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User patrickobe1

HFR wird leider nur von den eingebauten Apps unterstütze, nicht via HDMI, ausser das wäre kürzlich geändert worden.

29.04.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Hannes2000

Ich habe bei dem Satz zuerst auch die Augenbrauen hochgezogen. Gemeint ist aber nicht, dass das menschliche Auge nicht mehr erkennen kann. Die Aussage des Satzes ist, dass mit 24 Bildern pro Sekunde die Bilder nicht als einzelne Bilder wahrgenommen werden, sondern als flüssige Bewegung.

Ansonsten würde auch HFR keinen Sinn machen.

01.05.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User foCus7560

Wenn wir schon bei "technical correctness" sind: Der analoge Kinofilm wird zwar mit 24 fps aufgenommen, aber projeziert (wo analog) wird jedes Bild zweimal, also mit 48 fps! (Ich war fürher mal Kinooperateur.) Aber Achtung: Die Verdoppelung unterdrückt zwar das Flimmern (da 24 fps für unser Auge flimmern, 48 fps aber nicht), macht jedoch Bildabläufe nicht flüssiger, da ja nur 24 fps an Information. Und deshalb wirkte Fernsehen mit 50 (Halb-)Bildern und MAZ schon immer flüssiger als Kino.

01.05.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Luca Fontana

Danke @Hannes2000 fürs Präzisieren ;). Und danke @foCus7560 für die spannenden Hintergrundinfos aus der Kinobranche :)

@patrickobe1: Lasse ich mir noch seitens LG bestätigen, dann komme ich wieder auf dich zurück.

02.05.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User cino1

Mais il faut quand même préciser qu'on est capable de voir au delà de 24 images par seconde mais l'auteur prétendait peut-être dire qu'on peut pas distinguer chaque frame tellement ça va vite. Mais si une vidéo tourne à 30 ou 60 fps l'oeil humain est capable de le distinguer.

04.05.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User 4marco

Nun wirklich wissen ob die Dinger was taugen, tue ich nun auch nicht nach diesem Artikel. Zwar viel Hintergrund Info, doch fehlt die Beurteilung der umschriebenen Neuerungen komplett...
Sowieso würde ich persönlich für mehr Kontrast auch nicht das doppelte als für einen LCD bezahlen wollen.

01.05.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Luca Fontana

Nur Geduld. Das hier ist ein «First Look», in einem nicht neutralen Umfeld. Daher umschreibe ich die Features ohne finale Wertung. Ein Test folgt, aber der braucht Zeit, da ein TV-Test unter Laborbedingungen nicht viel Sinn macht. Schliesslich muss er ja Zuhause gut aussehen, nicht im perfekt abgedunkelten Zimmer mit Inhalten, die exakt auf die Stärken des TVs abgestimmt sind. Richtig? :)

02.05.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User alic0boy

Mich würde interessieren, ob schon Material in HFR auf Datenträgern angeboten wird oder ob schon bekannt ist wann und wie man zu solchen Filmen kommen kann. Streaming ist für mich ausgeschlossen : 24 Bilder/s brauchen ja schon mindestens 25MB/s in (stark komprimiertem) 4K...

01.05.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Screwface

Schliesse mich den Meisten hier an; viel Marketing-Blabla und wenig bis keine verwertbaren Infos. Ich wäre ja dafür, dass Pioneer ihre "Kuro" wieder aufleben lässt. Etwas besseres, in Sachen Bild-Homogenität, gab es im TV-Bereich bis heute nicht, auch wenn Plasmas bis zum Schluss genau wie OLEDs ihre Schwächen hatten. Meine Hoffnung liegt nun bei μLED...

02.05.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment