You're not connected to the Internet.
Corporate logo
AudioKnow-how 9662

Audio compression: facts, myths and a blind listening test

It’s undeniable that you get some loss in audio compression, for instance when creating MP3 files. But the question is, is it noticeable? When does discerning listening end and geeky esoterism begin? We ran a blind test to get answers. Read on for the results and to find out how to create your own test.

Audio compression is part and parcel of day-to-day life. Almost every piece of music you listen to has been compressed. But audio signal processing is hard to understand unless you specialise or are trained in it. That’s why – at least in my experience – most people either don’t bother to understand it or demonise MP3 and anything linked with compression.

I wanted to know: Can you really enjoy music if you only listen to it on Spotify and YouTube? Or don’t we notice the difference between the best possible quality?

Numbers and what they mean

Various parameters give you information about sound quality – but how do you decode it all? Here is an outline of the terms you’re likely to come across:

1. Bit rate

Bit rate expresses the number of bits processed per second. It’s sometimes called a data transfer rate or bandwidth.

The concept is fairly intuitive: the more data, the greater the sound quality. In everyday terms, bit rate is the most important parameter. However, looking at it alone won’t tell you much about sound quality.

Here’s where it gets interesting. There isn’t just one type of bit rate. Instead, they are classed as either variable or constant. These days, most of bit rates are variable (VBR for short). In passages where «not a lot happens», you can compress the file more without audible loss. Complex passages, on the other hand, store a lot of data. What this means is you end up with the same file size but a higher sound quality. Usually, variable bit rates are given as an average and sometimes as the maximum possible value.

2. Compression process

AAC compresses more efficiently than MP3. This means you get better quality than MP3 for an identical bit rate. The same goes for Ogg Vorbis, which Spotify use.

Even encoders, compression software, have an impact on quality. In the early days of MP3, 128 kbit/s tracks often sounded awful. Now they’re much improved, as poor quality encoders are no longer used.

3. Bit depth

Bit depth represents how many bits a sample has. That’s why it’s also known as sampling depth. The more bits there are per sample, the more nuances in volume across the track.

If you’re a photography or video buff, you might have already heard of bit depth. The good news is, bit depth in audio compression has a similar meaning.

Image sizer
Know-how
Manuel Wenk

Manuel Wenk

Video Producer

To user profile
  • 822

Kurz erklärt: 8bit vs. 10bit oder teure Systemkamera gegen Smartphone

A CD has 16 bits per stereo channel. MP3s and other compressed audio files, on the other hand, don’t have a set bit depth. While bit depth doesn’t play much of a part in day-to-day life, it is an important part of studio recordings. In that context, 24 bit is sometimes also used to get more out of recording when it is processed. Afterwards, the music is scaled down to 16 bit as audio experts claim you then can’t hear the difference.

To be honest, it’s Neil Young’s fault that bit depth is being talked about outside of recording studios at all. Young sells a music player called Pono that uses a 24-bit format. Listen to a Neil Young track played in 16 bit und 8 bit (not 24) here. Try it out and see if you can hear the difference. If you think that’s tricky, don’t get me started on the 16 bit v 24 bit comparison.

4. Sample rate

Sample rate (also known as sampling rate) doesn’t come into the equation for the average listener. Where it is essential is in understanding how to save audio digitally. Let me give you an example. A CD has a sample rate of 44100 Hz or 44.1 kHz. Hertz is a unit that more or less gives the rate per second. In terms of audio sampling, that means sound level is measured 44,100 times every second. As I mentioned before: It’s worth working with higher values here, but these won’t be kept in the final format that is for sale.

Nyquist theorem: many people think digital music implies loss and that you’re missing out on the real analogue sound level. But this isn’t unexplored territory – on the contrary. This debate already came up with the advent of CDs. Audio snobs would deride newfangled CDs in favour of good old-fashioned records. But as history has shown, they were eventually proved wrong. The Nyquist sampling theorem says that you can completely reconstruct an audio curve without any loss by using individual points. This assumes the sampling rate is high enough. More specifically, the theorem explains the rate has to be twice as high as the bandwidth. As the limit of human hearing is 20,000 Hz, bandwidth is selected in this range. That’s what makes the sampling rate over 40,000 Hz.

5. Other factors

You can have all the parameters in the world, but they won’t be any use if the audio has been recorded badly. For example, you’ll lose the dynamic if your sound technician doesn’t set the sound level high enough. When you listen back to the recording and turn up the volume, you’re met with noise interference. But turn the sound level up too high and the result is even worse. Your recording is distorted, fragmented and scratchy. Or the dynamic compressor could make the result unrecognisable. Bad recordings are all over YouTube and common on CDs. They’re the result of very old studio recordings and live extracts from concerts.

As we’re on the topic of sound quality, your headphones and speakers also play a part. With poor quality mini speakers, for instance, you’ll barely be able to tell the difference between MP3 in 128 kbit/s and uncompressed music. That’s something you’d be able to distinguish on good speakers.

TMicro 40 AMT (1 pair, Stereo, Compact speakers, White)
CHF 1'160.–
Piega TMicro 40 AMT (1 pair, Stereo, Compact speakers, White)

Availability

Mail delivery

  • approx. 2–4 days
    In supplier's stock

Collection

  • All locations: approx. 3–5 days
    Currently in stock at the supplier

If ordered immediately.
Information subject to change.

View details

T 5 p 2nd Gen (Over-Ear)
CHF 879.–
Beyerdynamic T 5 p 2nd Gen (Over-Ear)
4

Availability

Mail delivery

  • only 1 piece(s)
    in our warehouse

PickMup

Collection

  • Basel: today at 13:10
  • Bern: today at 12:45
  • Dietikon: today at 14:30
  • Geneva: today at 13:30
  • Kriens: today at 12:00
  • Lausanne: today at 15:40
  • St Gallen: today at 15:30
  • Winterthur: today at 13:30
  • Wohlen: today at 11:00
  • Zurich: today at 12:30

If ordered immediately.
Information subject to change.

View details

R-15M (1 pair, Stereo, Compact speakers, Black Poly Veneer)
CHF 219.–
Klipsch R-15M (1 pair, Stereo, Compact speakers, Black Poly Veneer)
14

Availability

Mail delivery

  • more than 10 piece(s)
    in our warehouse

PickMup

Collection

  • Basel: only 1 piece(s)
  • Bern: only 1 piece(s)
  • Dietikon: only 1 piece(s)
  • Geneva: only 1 piece(s)
  • Kriens: only 1 piece(s)
  • Lausanne: only 1 piece(s)
  • St Gallen: only 1 piece(s)
  • Winterthur: today at 13:30
  • Wohlen: only 1 piece(s)
  • Zurich: only 1 piece(s)

If ordered immediately.
Information subject to change.

View details

And now it’s time to put our ideas to the test

As part of this article, I got ten members of the digitec team to take part in a blind listening test. I made sure the group was an equal mix of those who didn’t work with audio quality and weren’t too fussy about it and others who thought it was essential.

Junior editor Ramon: «It’s been ages since I heard an uncompressed file»
Chief editor Aurel: «Challenge accepted!»

Here’s what the group stats looked like: two women and eight men took part in the test. The age range for seven of the ten participants was 25 to 30, with the oldest in the group being 40. You can’t accuse my guinea pigs of going deaf with old age. All in all, they were a good mix of your average listeners, audio experts and people who make their own music. Most of them used my Sennheiser HD 449 as headphones, one person wanted to use their own and another did the test with a pair of our Logitech office headsets.

Roy from the gaming department has made music at a professional level and already started his audio engineering training. Guess what he’s got tattooed on his arm?
Editor Luca was pretty chilled out: «Want me to listen to a bit of music? Why not?»

They all listened to three music extracts from different genres (classical, jazz, pop/rock). The clips were about 30 to 45 seconds long. For each one, I scaled the .wav file down to CD quality (1411 kbit/s, PCM 16 bit) via a number of compression stages using LAME and the AAC Apple encoder:

  • MP3 V9 (lowest quality, roughly 65 kbit/s VBR): this is really quite bad and is rarely used.
  • MP3 V5 (medium quality, roughly 130 kbit/s VBR): you’ll still come across this in the world of streaming but it’s a thing of the past in downloads.
  • MP3 V0 (highest quality, roughly 245 kbit/s VBR): this is the quality you get in the Amazon shop.
  • AAC 256 kbit/s: given how much more efficient the AAC process is, it should give better results than the best MP3. This is the quality you find in the iTunes Store.

Then I converted the files back into WAV/PCM so you couldn’t tell which files were which by looking at them. In other words, all the files were the same size.

Try it out for yourself: you can even take the listening test at home. All you need to do is download these files from the digitec website. To make sure it stays a blind test, you need to extract the zip file before opening it. Only when you unzip the files do they appear the same size.

Junior editor Tanja: «I don’t have the best ears in the world.»
Senior editor Léonie: «The high-pitched sounds I can pick up would scare away all the local dogs.»

Results: interpreting the blind test

I originally intended to introduce each person and write up their individual results. But as I saw how the experiment was progressing, I realised that would just send you to sleep. The reason being the results were the same, regardless of whether the listener was an occasional listener or an audio geek.

All of the guinea pigs were quick to identify the worst quality (MP3 with VBR 65 kbit/s). Only two members of the group didn’t have the same success with the classical music. However, answers varied wildly for the other four levels. The participants unanimously admitted to being unsure or having to guess. They got the answer right about 20% of the time.

Strangely enough, the second worst file wasn’t identified as often as the best three. The alleged experts were no better than the occasional listeners. Now that’s something I didn’t expect. Everything I’d read said this level was easy to set apart from the others. Most of the time, the guinea pigs couldn’t distinguish average (variable) bit rates starting at 192 kbit/s from the original (Source). The second worst level was much lower at 130 kbit/s VBR.

Audio expert Dimitri isn’t new to these kinds of tests. He didn’t delude himself and gave four answers – which were right.
Hobby musician and audio specialist Fabio got increasingly confused. Everything seemed more or less clear at the start...

The participants didn’t get a heads-up about what they would get to listen to each time. If they had, the results might have been better. But I was more interested in recreating an everyday scenario. I mean, we listen to music in our spare time because we love it and not because we enjoy identifying compression faults.

Another helpless victim from our audio department: say hello to marketing specialist Thomas.
Senior editor Phil is the venerable age of 35. Shouldn’t we cut him some slack? That’s not happening.

You could, of course, complain that I didn’t carry out this test in the most optimal conditions. With top-of-the-range headphones, a special playback device and the backdrop of a silent office, you might be able to interpret more. However, as I explained, my aim was a realistic environment. It goes without saying that if you swear by uncompressed music, it’s not enough to just play the best quality files. You need to have the right gear as well. That means buying the high-end version of everything, from headphones to speakers, amplifiers, playback devices and even cables.

YouTube – the special case

Most YouTube videos use AAC with 128 kbit/s. In theory, the quality should be good enough. After all, our blind test participants couldn’t even tell which was an MP3 track when it had the same bit rate – and AAC is much better. That being said, I can hear a difference between music I play on my record player and music from YouTube videos. That probably has something to do with the fact that these audio files are converted a number of times. When you move sound to the video editor and export the video, the clip is already being compressed. When you upload it to YouTube, you’re converted the file again.

I tried to put that to the test by making a video with WAV audio and medium MP3. When it came to exporting, I made sure there was no audio compression. I used the same files as in the blind listening test, which you can download. I didn’t notice any distinct difference, but listen for yourself and let me know what you think.

Conclusions

The compression process is steadily improving. The variable bit rates, better codecs and optimised encoders available these days deliver quality so good it’s very difficult – if not impossible – to tell compressed files and CD tracks apart.

Buying music from Amazon or Apple means you’re always on the safe side. You won’t have sound quality issues and there's even room for improvement. The same applies when you stream Spotify and select the highest quality. Find out more here. As I mentioned, Codec Ogg Vorbis is better than MP3, which is why 96 kbit/s is still acceptable.

The problem arises when you have compressed material that is compressed again. But even in this instance, my YouTube test made me doubt whether it’s as bad as I thought. It’s certainly not a good idea to convert your music collection from MP3 into AAC just because this is the better codec. You should even have an uncompressed copy of music you recorded yourself. You’d then export it to MP3 or AAC to listen to it. As for Bluetooth, it compresses music that is already compressed. However, Bluetooth technology has come on in leaps and bounds in recent years. In fact, if you’re using a high-quality, uncompressed file and a high-end Bluetooth codec, you shouldn’t be able to detect any flaws.

After this test, I’m feeling a lot more relaxed about the whole issue of audio compression – except where double compression is concerned. I realise now there’s no point in me worrying about the fancy-pants FLAC files that won’t play on my smartphone. Maybe the Spotify generation with their carefree approach to the topic (if they even think about it at all) aren’t too far off the mark. MP3 in today’s standard quality format is good enough and plays everywhere – and as of April 2017, MP3 was even licence-free.

These articles might also interest you

User
Durch Interesse an IT und Schreiben bin ich schon früh (2000) im Tech-Journalismus gelandet. Mich interessiert, wie man Technik benutzen kann, ohne selbst benutzt zu werden. Meine Freizeit ver(sch)wende ich am liebsten fürs Musikmachen, wo ich mässiges Talent mit übermässiger Begeisterung kompensiere.

96 comments

Please log in.

You have to be logged in to create a new comment.


User skynyrd

Wie immer liegt der Teufel im Detail begraben ... ein FLAC mit 24Bit 192kHz wird am Laptop-Kopfhörerausgang niemals so gut klingen, wie z.B. mit einem ordentlichen HiRes-Player (auch portabel) wie sie auch bei Digitec im Angebot zu finden sind. Wer "nur" auf dem Smartfon Musik hört, ist mit MP3 bestens bedient, wer mit richtigem HiFi-Equipment zu Werke geht, wird von MP3 sehr schnell auf den Boden der Realität geholt. Das Verhältniss muss halt immer passen. Ein Formel1-Rennwagen mit normaler Autobereifung ist genau so sinnlos wie ein normales Auto mit Formel1-Bereifung.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User sunstar7

Andererseits hat sich auch schon genug oft gezeigt, dass auch mit teurem Equipent und einem ABX-Blindtest nicht wirklich Unterschiede zw. lossless und komprimiert festgestellt werden konnten. Aber ich bin auch der Meinung, dass hier vielleicht etwas besseres Equipment hätte benutzt werden können. (Aber es geht ja schliesslich um den Durchschnittsnutzer, welcher keine 1000.- für Kopfhörer und/oder DAC/Amp ausgibt)

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User skynyrd

Dem stimme ich voll und ganz zu. Eine miese Studio-Aufnahme wird auch durch das teuerste Equipment dieser Erde keine gute Aufnahme. Das spielt dann Dateiformat und/oder Komprimierung keine Rolle mehr. Die ganze Kette von A-Z muss stimmen und in einem sinnvollen Verhältnis stehen. Wenn ich meine 1000.- Kopfhörer an meinem Smartfon anschliesse höre ich keine relevante Unterschiede zwischen MP3 und FLAC24/96, die 1000.- für den Kopfhörer ansatzweise rechtfertigen ... das Verhältnis stimmt so nicht.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Hannes2000

Wie schon mehrmals geschrieben wirst du wenn es sich um das gleiche Master handelt auch keinen Unterschied zwischen Flac 24/96 und MP3 in hoher Bitrate hören.
Die Flac 24/96 die man so erhält sind meistens anders gemastert, der Unterschied kommt meist daher. Wandle die Files doch mal in MP3 oder noch besser Vorbis oder Opus in höchster Qualität um und mach einen Blindtest.

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Hannes2000

@Skynyrd ansonsten hoffe ich, dass du bei einem nächsten solchen Test mit Highend-Equipment das Gegenteil beweisen kannst.

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User baumadom

@Hannes2000. Sorry aber ich bereits 3x solche Test gemacht und locker 90% erreicht. Und das nich mal auf Referenz Niveau. Sogar meine Freundin merkt den Unterschied. Ihr Kommentar: Das ist einfach mehr Konzertfeeling. Wie gesagt DAC muss stimmen und Headphones 100.- plus. Sonst geh mal zu einem HiFi Verkäufer. Viel Spass beim Musik gemiessen!

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User back2thebasics

Als Altagstest finde ich den Betrag sehr gelungen. Wie von schon mehrere angemerkt, wäre eine Wiederholung des Test sicher interessant mit Equipment im Highend Bereich.
Gerade bei Kopfhörern ist das Preisleistungsverhältnis absolut ok. Ist sicher für jedenman eine Erfahrung wert.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User David Lee

Absolut einverstanden! Ich hatte ursprünglich auch noch einen solchen Vergleich mit High-End-Equipment vor. Aber irgendwann musste der Beitrag dann auch mal fertig werden ;-) Das Thema gibt auf jeden Fall mehr als nur einen Text/Test her.

11.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User tschohel

Und was passiert mit der Qualität, wenn man sich den Sound aus einem Laptop via AUX anhört? Meine Soundkarte mit optischem Ausgang und guter Musikanlage würde da doch einige Qualitätsunterschiede zusätzlich aufdecken. Ab und zu ein FLAC hören ist eben schon toll. Super Artikel, mehr davon!

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User baumadom

Habe kürzlich einen Digital Analog Wandler gekauft für Laptop und Handy. WOW, der Unterschied für 100.- ist gewaltig. Auch ist der Unterschied zwischen FLAC und MP3 nochmals grösser und man hört plötzlich doch einen Unterschied.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User urswuergler

@ Tschohel: Laptop ist prima - via USB-Ausgang rutschen die Bits zum Kopfhörerverstärker und begeistern den Hörer. Dafür gibt's perfekt geeignete Geräte wie den Soundblaster E5.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User christof01

Bei mir umgekehrt. MacBook Pro / NAD BEE / Canton Vento spielen alle von mir ausprobierten Kombinationen an die Wand. Mehr Druck, mehr Wärme.
Kommentar Verkäufer (ca. 2008):
Der Verstärker soll ausschliesslich Audio verstärken. Mit optischem Kabel hast du meist einen AV Verstärker, die sind vollgepumpt mit Technik und Features.
Denon AVR 1912 / AVR-X6300H klangen flach, metallisch.

20.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User lionel.peer

Han de Artikel ned glese, aber die Lady ufem Titelbild (die 2. vo links) loset VERKEHRT UME Stereosound! #banause

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User David Lee

Ich wollte dazu zuerst was schreiben. Aber dann fiel mir ein, dass du das ja sicher auch nicht liest.

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User lionel.peer

@David Lee Tja, war halt auf der Startseite nicht zu übersehen. Mittlerweile habe ich den Artikel natürlich auch gelesen. Wirklich ein guter und sinnvoller Beitrag, danke dir!

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User David Lee

Danke auch - fürs Kompliment!

11.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Hannes2000

Schöner Test. Ein Follow-Up-Test mit HIghend Equipment wäre noch spannend. MP3 130kbit ist im Normalfall nicht transparent.
Mein Vorschlag dazu, ladet die Leute ein, die hier behaupten sie hören einen Unterschied von Flac zu MP3 320KBit.
Und nehmt ein DAC, Laptopausgänge sind meist schlecht.

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Hannes2000

Habe eure Files mal heruntergeladen. Die 96 Kbit MP3 waren problemlos rauszuhören, natürlich immer richtig getippt. Auch die MP3 130 Kbit habe ich alle richtig getippt, da wurde es aber zugegeben schon schwieriger. Alles drüber war mehr oder weniger zufällig bzw. konnte ich keinen Unterschied hören.

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Anonymous

"und eventuell sogar die Kabel ..."

Nach diesem Beitrag spielen die Kabel überhaupt keine Rolle: forums.audioholics.com/foru...

Monster Cable gegen Kleiderbügel.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User baumadom

Durfte für meine neuen Lautsprecher Kabel testen. Habe im Internet gelesen, dass teure Kabel nix bringen.
Tja der selbsttest hat gezeigt das Kabel durchaus etwas ausmachen. Jedoch ist dies Geschmacksache. Billige Kabel können je nach Verstärker besser sein.

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Hannes2000

@Baumadom Mit dieser Aussage bist du nun definitiv in der Audio-Esoterik gelandet. Wenn der Kabelquerschnitt gross genug und das Kabel ausreichend geschirmt ist, kann man nichts mehr weiter rausholen mit anderen Kabeln.

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User baumadom

Leider keine Esoterik Hannes. Try it bevor du hier von Esoterik fasselst und du wirst es selber hören.

20.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Anonymous

Und natürlich alles am HP-Laptop Kopfhörerausgang getestet, wo weiss Gott was für eine Katastrophensoftware noch im Hintergrund den Sound vergewaltigt (B&O, Beats Audio, Realtek, etc,etc). Holt euch doch einen richtigen High-End Hörer (a la Stax, HD800, Audeze LCD, etc) und einen anstädigen DAC/Amp.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Anonymous

Dann hört auch der Amateur-Laie einen Unterschied bei Formaten und Codecs. Glaubt mir, der Unterscheid ist VIEL grösser als man meint. Wie schon oft ist auch dieser Artikel nur "halbgar". Aber ansonsten schön erklärt :-)

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User sunstar7

To be fair, hast du schon mal einen Doppel-Blindtest gemacht mit deinem Equipment. Bei mir hörts bei 192kbit/s auf mit merklinchen Unterschieden. Habs schon getestet mit Campfire Andromedas, Phonak SE232 und Beyerdynamic DT1990 Pro an einem Burson Conductor Virtuoso V2+ bzw FiiO E17K. Für mich macht der grösste Unterschied das Equipment aus. Die Bitrate der Soundfiles ist meiner Erfahrung nacht recht irrelevant.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User m.windu

Sehr interessante Erkenntnis und vermutlich genau der Punkt.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User SFGiants28

Sunstar bei mir das gleiche, auch mit den Audeze LCD-2s oder den Beyerdynamic T1 wird es zwischen 192 und 256 schwierig wenn sie gut komprimiert sind.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Berky

Weswegen das Test-Equipment samt Laptop das hier verwendet wurde, als schlechtes Ausgabematerial dient, um solche Unterschiede heraus zu hören.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User baumadom

Interessantes Thema! Jedoch höre ich schon den Unterschied zwischen spotify (320kbs) und Tidal (HiFi) bei gut produzierter Musik.
Man sollte bei einem solchen Experiment zuerst alle Komponenten min auf HiFi Qualität bringen. Auch den Hörer zeigen was HiFi ist. Nicht jeder mag mehr Dynamik und Raum

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User fumo

Mit "gut produzierter Musik" triffst du den Nagel auf den Kopf. Heutzutage wird vieles viel zu "sauber" herausgegeben und darum gibt es erst gar keine Faktoren die durch eine Komprimierung verfälscht werden könnten. Geräusche im Frequenzbereich des "slap" der Gitarren-/Bassseite oder leichte Atmungsgeräusche in der Stimme werden im Studio schon rausgewaschen.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User urswuergler

@Baumadom: den Unterschied gibt es. Allerdings ist er klein. Für mich spielt seit Jahren Folgendendes die wichtigste Rolle (nach abnehmender Bedeutung geordnet):
1. Schallwandler (egal ob Kopfhörer oder Lautsprecher)
2. Verstärker (was ein portabler Kopfhörer-Verstärker zu leisten vermag, ist kaum zu glauben)
3. Datenformat (mit 16 bit PCM bin ich zufrieden. Im Blindtest haben 24 Bit keinen Vorteil gebracht)

Auf die Datenquelle bin ich nicht eingegangen. Man sollte für einen guten Test natürlich etwas sehr Hochwertiges von Chesky, Stockfisch, ECM oder Ähnlichem wählen.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Hannes2000

Der Unterschied könnte aber daher kommen dass die Musik auf Tidal evtl. anders gemastert wurde. Am Format wird es zu 99.9% nicht liegen. Der Dynamikumfang ist bei MP3 grundsätzlich mehr als gross genug.

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User alexreusch

Der Bericht ist sicher für einen Grossteil der Konsumenten OK und stimmig. Wer nur auf dem Smartphone Musik hört ohne zusätzlichen Schnick-Schnack, braucht sich um die Qualität der Files nicht zu kümmern. Für ein wenig Berieselung passt das schon.

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User alexreusch

Aber die Unterschiede sind schon da und auch deutlich zu hören. Dafür sollte man aber vielleicht schon etwas besseres Equipment einsetzen als nur ein Standard-Notebook mit 0815 Player-Software.

Der grösste Unterschied macht das Ausgangsmaterial. Wenn die Tontechniker im Studio Ihren Job nicht gut gemacht haben, dann hilft die beste Sampling Rate bzw. File Qualität nichts mehr. Ist wie ein Foto, das unscharf und verwackelt ist. Da nützt es nichts, wenn man dafür Super-Equipment eingesetzt hat und in 36MP im RAW Format geknipst hat. Eine schlechte Aufnahme wird durch gutes Equipment höchstens noch schlimmer zum hören. Im Gegenteil: Da hilft es, wenn man nicht alles hört...

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User alexreusch

Wenn die Aufnahme stimmt, hört man den Unterschied der verschiedenen Files, WENN das Equipment dies unterstützt. Im Minimum sollte man beim Abspielen mit einem PC/Notebook einen externen DAC (z.B. Audioquest DragonFly Red, Chord Mojo etc.) sowie einen dafür geeigneten Kopfhörer verwenden. Optimal wäre dazu noch ein spezieller Software Player (Audirvana, HQPlayer, Roon etc.). Den Unterschied der normalen Streaming-Dienste wie Spotify gegenüber CD-Qualität kann man gut heraushören, darüber wird dann die Luft sicherlich dünner...

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User alexreusch

Unterschiede sind aber auch da noch auszumachen, wenn auch nur noch marginal. Dafür braucht es dann aber schon noch spezifische Hardware. Die Möglichkeiten sind da Grenzenlos - Ach ja, da wären noch die Kabel... ;-)

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User alexreusch

Wie ich bereits erwähnt habe, ist die Aufnahme ein wichtiger Faktor. Frei nach dem Motto: Shit in -->Shit out. Nur ist es gar nicht so einfach, gutes Material zu finden. Ein Grossteil des Mainstreams (Pop/Rock) ist einfach schlecht produziert. Da hilft auch CD Qualität oder Tidal nichts.

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User alexreusch

Tidal ist beispielsweise sehr Mainstream lastig. Da hat man zwar CD-Qualität, aber Schrott bleibt Schrott. Für mich ist es jeweils die grösste Herausforderung, gute Aufnahmen zu finden. In einem Vergleichstest sollte man dann auch nur hochwertig produzierte Songs einbeziehen. Ob sich jetzt "Züri West" für einen Audio Test eignet??? Eher nicht.

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User alexreusch

Es gibt heute ein paar wenige Studios, die sich der Audioqualität verschrieben haben. Was von dort kommt, kann man fast ausnahmslos für Tests verwenden. Für einen Test solltet Ihr Euch eine Referenzliste an geeigneten Songs erstellen und dann die gleiche Aufnahme in unterschiedlichen Qualitätsstufen direkt vom Anbieter beziehen (anstatt selber zu konvertieren). Bei Vergleichen mit Streaming Anbietern müsst Ihr immer den Titel vom identischen Album wählen, da die Unterschiede von Album zu Album extrem hoch sein können (Re-Mastering lässt grüssen). Aber auch die Streaminganbieter haben ja ihre Songs in Ihr eigenes Format konvertiert und da kann manchmal sehr viel schief gehen...

17.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User digital-light

C'est dommage - car utiliser un dac et ampli casque de haut de gamme aurait permis de vraiment tester les encodages (en supprimant de l'équation tout le biais apporté par un dac / ampli / alim de qualité moyenne voire faible - mais en utilisant le dac/ampli d'un pc-laptop, cela shape et limite combien du format de fichier est vraiment et de façon transparente arrivée dans les oreilles des testeurs. AKG-702 sur une Apogee Duet, ou Cambridge Audio - aurait permis d'avoir une vision plus claire, non ?

18.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User dariolym

Je n'y ai pas pensé en lisant l'article, mais le DAC / Ampli du PC à certainement été l'élément qui a nivelé tout ça par le bas et qui a rendu les fichier méconnaissables.
Aurai-ce été mieux avec un iPhone par exemple? ou un autre smartphone?
Je me souviens du DAC de mon Nokia N9 qui me permettait de lire des fichier à 96KHz.

19.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User digital-light

Oui c'est bien le problème avec un dac / ampli d'un niveau aussi bas

Le fait de lire un fichier à plus haut écantillonage ou profondeur (16-24) n'est qu'une question de logiciel, le dac et l'ampli doivent toujours faire le boulot en aval et donc vont montrer leurs limites. Un iphone ou un smartphone n'ont pas de dac ou d'ampli casque particulièrement haut de gamme. Ca peut être correct, mais c'est pas du haut de gamme.

Une Apogee Duet + un AKG 702 (ou autre casque haut de gamme d'une réputation de grande transparence et linarité) auraient permis de vraiment entendre les différence dans les encodage, et de ne pas entendre le nivellement du dac / ampli.

19.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Inshaman

Did you notice that your Léonie (pic 2) is wearing the headphones backwards? It's too bad as it makes an otherwise good article look a bit amateurish. Furthermore, it is a bit strange to use a laptop's audio chip instead of a proper DAC and Headphone AMP which really brings better compressions out.

18.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User fcastrosantos

Although I would normally share your views on this matter, the author was trying to have a "real world" test — and in the "real world", not all of us have DACs and proper headphones.

Interestingly enough, a few sound engineers actually listen to their masters on crappy iPhone headphones just so gauge how the mix is going.

I believe this is a valid empirical test for "everyday users" — not audiophiles.

19.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Inshaman

I agree with you but then "everyday users" do not care about how their music is compressed. I am certain that 95% of people reading this article have a least a minimum interest in this domain.
What would have been interesting is do the the same test, using the same people, the same music and compressed files but ask them to compare the laptop & HD 449 headphones to a laptop, DAC/AMP, HD 449 heaphones. Then ask them if they do hear a difference and which file is supposedly better.

22.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Anonymous

Ich hab's ausprobiert und die Files kurz angespielt. So spontan waren die schlechtesten 2 jeweils zweifelsfrei identifizierbar. Wenn man die Files komplett anhört und miteinander vergleicht, könnte man vermutlich noch weitere Unterschiede ausmachen.

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Andre1681

Ein vergleichstest mit hochaufgelöstem Audiofile und unterschiedlichem Equipment würde ich mir wünschen.
Ab wann hört man Unterschiede und wann hört man keine mehr.
Garbage in Garbage out, gilt nicht nur für die Audiofiles.
Meiner Meinung nach ist Technik genau so wichtig wie die Datenqualität.

11.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Anonymous

Bei diesem Test fehlt mir ein brauchbare Wandler (DAC). Schon die günstigen Fiio, die Digitec auch führt, wären um Meilen besser als die in Laptops und Smartphones eingebauten Codecs und Verstärker und würden die Kompression bedeutend einfacher zu hören machen.

11.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User grrrmbl

Ein Tipp für alle, die Musik über iTunes hören: Es gibt Software, die den Datenfluss so an iTunes vorbeischleust, dass dieses den Klang nicht negativ beeinflussen kann – was es normalerweise ziemlich fest tut. Auf meiner (zugegeben teuren) Anlage ist der Unterschied deutlich hörbar.

19.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User grrrmbl

Es macht in aller Regel viel mehr aus als unterschiedliche Kompressionsformate.

Ich setze dazu Audirvana Plus ein und kann es nur empfehlen. Es läuft im Hintergrund, so dass man iTunes fast gänzlich normal nutzen kann.

audirvana.com

19.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User christof01

Könnt ihr mir mal eure Komponenten auflisten?
MacBook (Köpfhörerausgang), NAD 325BEE, Canton Vento 807DC.
Suche Nachfolger... eben mit iTunes und habe noch keinen volldigitalen Nachfolger gefunden. Primare I15?

20.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User grrrmbl

iTunes und Audirvana Plus laufen auf Mac Mini 2012, dieser ist per USB an einer Verstärkerkombi Classé Sigma SSP + AMP 5 angeschlossen, an welchem Piega TC 10 X und ein Subwoofer (Eigenbau) hängen. Dazu noch den Hörraum mit etwas Baswaphon bedämpft.

Ja, Primare ist sicher eine seriöse Marke. Das Modell kenne ich jedoch nicht. Pro-Ject hat glaubs auch gute und zahlbare Digitalkomponenten.

20.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User christopheclaudel

1/11
Je travaille comme producteur de musique électronique et j'ai lu avec attention cet article qui ne m'a absolument pas convaincu.
Les arguments techniques me paraissent tous parfaitement réfutables.

27.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User christopheclaudel

2/11
Quant au "test" audio proposé, il n'est objectivement pas sérieux : l'enregistrement initial de la 5e de Beethoven est de qualité médiocre, avec peu de variantes et un spectre de fréquences ramassé. Normal qu'on n'entende pas de différence entre la version WAV et celle en mp3.

27.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User iBobDigitec

Deshalb habe ich ein LG G6 gekauft und höre Musik vorzugsweise in FLAC 16/24 Bit. Es ist wirklich grandios was man da plötzlich alles hört und welche feinen Details zum Vorschein kommen. Sehr zu empfehlen ist hier Led Zeppelin und vor allem Pink Floyd oder Jimi Hendrix.

09.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User Hannes2000

Das hörst du dann aber weil das LG G6 einen guten DAC hat und weniger weil du FLAC hörst. Ich würde mehrere tausend Franken wetten, dass du einen Unterschied zwischen MP3 320Kbit und Flac nicht hören kannst.
Dass eine Musikarchivierung in Flac trotzdem sinnvoll sein kann ist ein anderes Thema.

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User Anonymous

Spontan den Test gemacht. Mit Sony MDR-EX450AP (ca. 40 CHF) und Intel NUC (rauscht im Linux ein wenig), waren die beiden unteren Bitraten schnell gefunden. Sonst kleine Dreher. Klassik ist gar nicht einfach :) Bei hohee Lautstärke ist es deutlich. Heute Abend teste ich laut auf der Stereoanlage.

10.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User StageSolutions

Die Ohren sind ein sehr feines Sinnesorgan. Die wahrnehmbare Dynamik (leisester noch wahrnehmbarer Ton - lautester erträglicher Lärm) ist riesig. Und uns auf neue Sinneswahrnehmungen einzustellen braucht sowieso Zeit. Natürlich kann niemand aus 30 Sekunden Musik Feinheiten heraushören. Macht den Test

11.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User StageSolutions

zB. mit langen Sologesangspassagen und konzentriert Euch nicht auf 'HA, ich hab einen Unterschied gehört' sondern fragt die Testperson, nach dem Raum, in dem gesungen wurde. Oder ob sie die SängerIn atmen spürte...

11.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User StageSolutions

Dieses Testsetup sagt genauso wenig aus, wie wenn Du für einen Bildschirmtest Grafiker in einen dunklen Raum sperrst und ihnen nacheinander 10 helle Bildschirme zeigst und sie dann fragst, welcher die präziseste Farbdarstellung hatte.

11.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User saxuisse

Der grösste Störfaktor ist nicht die MP3 Komprimierung oder der nicht so teure Kopfhörer, sondern die Störgeräusche in deinem Umfeld. Wer seine edle Musik zuhause hört, benutzt vermehrt sicher anders Equipment. Unterwegs sinkt mein Anspruch "hörbar". 😉

11.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User moorisgre

Interessant, hab bereits solche tests gemacht und weiss das unterschiede teils kaum bis gar nicht gehört werden.
Interessant ist wenn jemand ein Song nur in schlecht kennt finden diese den eher besser als die Gute aufnahme...
Mit versch. tonleitern wäre dies wohl effektiver.

13.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User christof01

Meine Digitalmusik höre ich via Kopfhörerausgang Macbook Pro, hochwertiges Kabel auf einen NAD 325BEE Verstärker auf Canton Vento 807DC Boxen. Warm, druckvoll, natürlich von Klassik bis Hard Rock.
Ich will aktualisieren, bis jetzt tönt alles (USB Wandler, Denon AVR 1912) kalt. Was benutzt ihr?

20.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User christof01

Denon AVR-X6300H ist mit meinen Boxen auch durchgefallen. Flach, metallisch.

20.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User alexreusch

Bezahlbar? Nuprimeaudio wäre da eventuell eine schöne Kombi. DAC 10/ST-10(M) oder DAC 9/STA-9 (falls Du es "wärmer" bevorzugst). Die Amps kannst Du Stereo oder auch als Mono-Konfig fahren. Der DAC via USB am Mac funktioniert einwandfrei oder via MicroRendu auch für Roon geeignet. Preis/Leistung stimmt!

24.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User alexreusch

Ein AVR wird im Stereo-Test gegen eine spezialisierte Audio-Komponente immer flach rauskommen. Speziell bei der "Massenware". Denon gehört da zwar schon zu den besseren Herstellern, wobei die Schwesterfirma Marantz im Stereo-Bereich besser geeignet ist. Aber auch hier wird eine Stereo-Komponente überzeugender auftreten, was ja Dein NAD bereits bewiesen hat.

24.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User arminjansen

Also das versteh ich nicht:
"Danach habe ich die Files in WAV/PCM zurückkonvertiert,..."
Also aus einem MP3 file, wo ohnehin schon jede Menge fehlt, angeblich wieder WAV rechnen???

Ich hör den Unterschied zwischen FLAC von CD erstellt und MP3. Am besten auf meinem Sony NWZ und Sony MDR1-ADAC.

21.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User christof01

Ich nehm an, das war um die Files alle gleich gross zu machen und niemand merkt, welches die komprimierten sind. Ein Blindtest.

21.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User arminjansen

Richtig! Der Vergleich mit WAV macht aber so leider keinen Sinn.
WAV ist nur der "Container". Der KANN natürlich CD Daten enthalten mit 44,1kB/s. Wenn ich den Container allerdings nur mit MP3 zB 320kB/s füttere (wie hier beschrieben) wird da auch nicht mehr drin sein. Somit kann es keinen hörbaren Unterschied zu der neu erstellten WAV geben.
Der Test kann daher nur Aufschluss geben über den Vergleich der versch. MP3 Sampling Raten.
Der Vergleich mit echten WAV oder FLAC von Cds fehlt leider.

21.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User naibaf7

- Konnte beim Klassik alle unterscheiden (also die drei schlechtesten) und zwischen den zwei besten war es raten.
- Beim Jazz konnte ich die zwei schlechtesten erkennen und die anderen 3... kein Unterschied bemerkt.
- Als ich beim Rock ankam hatte ich nicht mehr so lust... schlechte Aufnahme.

23.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

User naibaf7

Bei der klassichen Aufnahme war wohl von Anfang an das Mastering besser. Gute (und viele) Mikrofone und wenig Nachbearbeitung.
Bei der Jazzaufnahme sind z.T. die hi-hats sowieso schon zu viel am zischen (zu wenig Mikrofone oder schlechte Gain-control bei der Aufnahme). Dann macht die MP3 Kompression eben auch nicht mehr viel aus.
Die Rockaufnahme leidet massiv unter dynamik-Kompression, wurde absolut schlecht gemastert. Wohl fürs Radio zerquetscht (Züri West typisch).

Wohlgemerkt habe ich keine super teure Abspielausrüstung verwendet. PreSonus Audiobox USB als Verstärker, und PreSonus HD7 Kopfhörer. Gabs als Set mit Mikrofon mal für 250.-

23.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User diatoun

Il y a pas longtemps j'écoutais de la musique sur Spotify sur mon ordi et à un moment j'me suis dis qu'un truc allait pas.. Je vais voir dans les préférences : la qualité audio était sur 160kBits/s, une fois repass en 320kBit/s tout était de nouveau "normal".. Comme quoi..

23.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment

User c.brancher

Vielen Dank für die teils wertvollen Informationen. Der durchschnittliche Musikhörer wird hier sicher gut bedient und auch die Aussagen betreffend Hörbarkeit sind für diesen zutreffend.
ABER, Musikgeniesser werden auf jeden Fall unkomprimierte Musik auf gutem HiFi-Equipment vorziehen.
Jedem das Seine.

24.01.2018
Report abuse

You must log in to report an abuse.

You must be logged in to reply to a comment